12 MHz oscillator with a Voltage range 120V

Discussion in 'Wireless & RF Design' started by kazemihossein33, May 12, 2018.

  1. kazemihossein33

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 12, 2018
    2
    0
    Hello friends
    I need a 12 MHz oscillator with a Voltage range of 120V
    Preferably designed with cross coupling and non-integrated circuits




    If I had a problem with my sentences, I'd like to apologize because I'm not English
    Thank you for your guidance
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    11,760
    2,487
    Will this oscillator be powered from a DC supply of 120 volts? If not what kind of power source will you use?
    There are many oscillators that use dicrete transistors or even vacuum tubes. Is that what you have in mind?
     
    kazemihossein33 likes this.
  3. ScottWang

    Moderator

    Aug 23, 2012
    6,423
    995
    What is the purpose of this power?
     
    kazemihossein33 likes this.
  4. kazemihossein33

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 12, 2018
    2
    0
    Yes, I want to use the dc120v source.
    And transistors of type bjt
    Unfortunately, the oscillator frequency does not exceed 6 MHz
    Schematic circuit
    VVVVV
    VVV
    V
     
  5. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    18,700
    3,640
    Hello,

    Why do you want to have the 12 MHz?
    Is the 120 V the peak-peak value?
    What will be the load?

    Bertus
     
  6. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    11,760
    2,487
    I think fabricating this on a single substrate is what makes it work. I don't know if it will work when made from discrete components. I'm not that familiar with symbols used in IC design but the cross coupled BJTs are just a standard multivibrator circuit. We made these from 12AT7 dual triodes when I was an undergraduate and transistors were thought to be a "passing" fad. I don't understand the stacked symbols that look like FETs. Are the control signals used to control the FETs as variable resistors to change the frequency of the oscillator?

    Note: I get confused real quick when trying to read actual patents. I leave that for practitioners "skilled" in the art.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2018
  7. ian field

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 27, 2012
    6,252
    1,131
    The patent schematic looks like a cascaded or stacked casc-ode amplifier stage.

    Less limitations might mean less stages are needed if discrete components are used.

    A 600V MOSFET is an easy way, but regulating gate bias can be tricky if you don't do it right.
     
  8. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
    5,015
    1,524
Loading...