10 second timed circuit

Thread Starter

ElectroMann

Joined May 10, 2022
2
Hey there,
I am designing an electric circuit powering an LED light. I need the LED to be on for 10 seconds, then off for 10 seconds, and to repeat this as long as it has power (slow rate flashing). I found timers that would allow me to do this, but I am looking for more cost-effective ways to do it. Any thoughts??
I would really appreciate the help.
Thanks, Abe
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
4,933
An LED light could means anything from a single Indicator LED at a few milliwatts to the 120 3W LEDs being discussed in another thread.

How about some specifics about the light and how it is powered? This is necessary to give you a reasonable solution.

Bob
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,676
Welcome to AAC.’

There are two obvious ways to do this cheaply.

One is the 555 IC which is very well suited to the application. It is a timer IC costing less than a dollar which can be configured as an astable multivibrator (an oscillator) that will do what you want. It requires a few external components and some calculations concerning the RC time constant that wil get you the timing you want.

The second is the ATTiny 13a microcontroller which can be programmed in the Arduino IDE environment then moved to whatever circuit you’d like. It requires one external passive component and the timing is very easily adjustable. It is also very cheap though you will need a programmer which costs a few dollars. This of course, can be reused.

The advantage of the 555 approach is that you only need the chip and the few components, The advantage if the MCU approach is very easy modification and more sophisticated behavior if you choose to add it.
 

Thread Starter

ElectroMann

Joined May 10, 2022
2
Thank you both!

BobTPH, regarding the circuit, you are correct - I should provide more info... However I have not yet selected the exact components.

Yaakov, thank you for the suggestion! I have considered this option too and have looked at some calculators to help figure out the capacitor I will need. Do you know if this approach will allow me to create the time on as well as time off of the circuit so they are the same or similar?
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,676
Thank you both!

BobTPH, regarding the circuit, you are correct - I should provide more info... However I have not yet selected the exact components.

Yaakov, thank you for the suggestion! I have considered this option too and have looked at some calculators to help figure out the capacitor I will need. Do you know if this approach will allow me to create the time on as well as time off of the circuit so they are the same or similar?
You have complete control of on and off times. This thread might help:

The 555 in a thread here: https://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/threads/astable-multivibrator-using-555.62835/post-427033
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
4,933
But, depending on how much current and voltage is involved, the switching might be more complex. For all we know, his talking about a mains powered lamp.

Bob
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
1,762
Thank you both!

BobTPH, regarding the circuit, you are correct - I should provide more info... However I have not yet selected the exact components.

Yaakov, thank you for the suggestion! I have considered this option too and have looked at some calculators to help figure out the capacitor I will need. Do you know if this approach will allow me to create the time on as well as time off of the circuit so they are the same or similar?
What experience in electronics do you have?
- logic
- programming
- Arduino / raspberry pi
- soldering
- PCB design

what level of effort do you want to put into this?
- PCB design
- soldering
- plugging some parts together without soldering or custom boards

..and what accuracy do you need?
- how close to the atomic clock's version of 10-seconds does your 10-seconds have to be?
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,676
But, depending on how much current and voltage is involved, the switching might be more complex. For all we know, his talking about a mains powered lamp.

Bob
Yes, but since the front end will be little affected by any ancillary switching circuitry I figured to address that first.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
1,762
More cost effective than a pre-made timer module...yea, I don't think so.
Yes, I forgot one question, would you rather spend more in shipping from a few different companies than a commercial off-the-shelf timer would cost? Does spending s few dollars in components, a few for an enclosure, a few for circuit board, a few for wire, battery or dc adapter, by that time, you are both spending more for your project and increasing the chances of burning down your house.
 
Top