Youtube electronic circuits.. good or bad?

Thread Starter

skeer

Joined Oct 28, 2022
103

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
14,408
As a novice I can see they work
You see what they want you to see. There are loads of fake/scam/misleading videos (e.g of 'free energy' devices) , but as a novice it may not be easy to distinguish them from genuinely helpful videos.
Just because a circuit is simple doesn't necessarily mean it is invalid or inefficient.
 
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panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
2,872
well... if one can make something really good with far fewer parts and in no time, they must be making a killing and those products should be marketed everywhere and replace all of those overengineered products on every lab bench and store shelf. all the topics about ripple, stability etc must be just marketing talk to sell you something you do not need.

jokes aside, very few things can be done well using only a handful of parts. that is because using same part (or circuit) for more than one function is almost always a compromise. and by using compromise one can make things look ok from certain angle. internet is full of junk taking you down to wrong path. one has to be careful not to fall in traps.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
7,996
When you see one of those simple "Dead Bug Build" (resistors and transistors soldered together without using a bread board or PCB) they may actually work. They work long enough to get your attention. But what happens 10 minutes later? Is the circuit still working? Has something burned out? Was something expensive damaged by this cheap circuit? The world may never know.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
9,271
but would an experienced person ever use such a simple circuit? And are these circuits valid to build upon for the novice?
An experienced engineer would look at the requirements and design a circuit
that is not overly complicated while meeting the requirements.

A power supply for an LED lighted decorative piece would not have the same stringent requirements as a lab grade bench supply. Hopefully, the circuit would be much simpler.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
31,083
(1) Is this a good or bad circuit design?
(2) Is this a good or bad circuit construction technique?
(3) Is this a good or bad method of disseminating knowledge of electronics?

These are the questions one need to address.

1716992701994.png

(1) Is this a good or bad circuit design?
That cannot be answered unless one analyzes, builds, and tests the circuit.

(2) Is this a good or bad circuit construction technique?
If the diagram is intended to show how a build a circuit by wiring components together from point to point, then this is a terrible way to build a circuit. Such a circuit would be very prone to short circuits and failure sooner or later. While it may serve as a quick test without using a proper circuit board or prototype board, there are much more secure and permanent construction techniques.

  1. Perforated board without copper
  2. Perforated board with copper, e.g. Veroboard, Vector prototyping board
  3. Solder lugs and terminal strips
  4. Manhattan style on copper laminate
  5. Printed circuit board

(3) Is this a good or bad method of disseminating knowledge of electronics?
Maybe the intention was to introduce electronics to an audience with zero or little knowledge of electronics components and circuit design. The intention is to produce a working circuit without having to delve into an explanation of how the circuit works.

Also, by keeping the YouTube content quick and simple, at attracts a larger number of "Likes" which garnishes greater financial rewards.

If this is the intention, then it is a great disservice to potential electronics hobbyists and enthusiasts. A proper electronics design and construction project should begin with a circuit design, schematics, and explanation.

In summary, you should avoid following any such presentations of circuit design and construction.
 

Thread Starter

skeer

Joined Oct 28, 2022
103
Thanks guys. In all honesty I'm not taking those guys 'designs' like, to the bank. Nor would I ever try to build something that's just individual parts soldered together and expect it to last very long. And yeah there is obviously zero allowances for ripple, stability, heat, etc.
Thanks for the opinions!
 

Thread Starter

skeer

Joined Oct 28, 2022
103
(3) Is this a good or bad method of disseminating knowledge of electronics?
Maybe the intention was to introduce electronics to an audience with zero or little knowledge of electronics components and circuit design. The intention is to produce a working circuit without having to delve into an explanation of how the circuit works.

Also, by keeping the YouTube content quick and simple, at attracts a larger number of "Likes" which garnishes greater financial rewards.

If this is the intention, then it is a great disservice to potential electronics hobbyists and enthusiasts. A proper electronics design and construction project should begin with a circuit design, schematics, and explanation.

In summary, you should avoid following any such presentations of circuit design and construction.
I'd argue.. for newbs and novices this is an easy to understand way of explaining how a specific circuit works. I love the idea of EveryCircuit.. it's not like super complete as far as available components go. I do wish there was something far more user friendly than LTSpice and more thorough than EveryCircuit.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
17,129
I love the idea of EveryCircuit.. it's not like super complete as far as available components go. I do wish there was something far more user friendly than LTSpice and more thorough than EveryCircuit.
I disregard every circuit I see that looks like it was drawn by a child. There's no way that high power voltage regulator circuit would work as shown.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
10,276
I disregard every circuit I see that looks like it was drawn by a child. There's no way that high power voltage regulator circuit would work as shown.
You mean, without a BIG heatsink?
It’s not even a regulator! The output voltage is proportional to the input voltage.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
19,422
(1) Is this a good or bad circuit design?
(2) Is this a good or bad circuit construction technique?
(3) Is this a good or bad method of disseminating knowledge of electronics?

These are the questions one need to address.

View attachment 323394

(1) Is this a good or bad circuit design?
That cannot be answered unless one analyzes, builds, and tests the circuit.

(2) Is this a good or bad circuit construction technique?
If the diagram is intended to show how a build a circuit by wiring components together from point to point, then this is a terrible way to build a circuit. Such a circuit would be very prone to short circuits and failure sooner or later. While it may serve as a quick test without using a proper circuit board or prototype board, there are much more secure and permanent construction techniques.

  1. Perforated board without copper
  2. Perforated board with copper, e.g. Veroboard, Vector prototyping board
  3. Solder lugs and terminal strips
  4. Manhattan style on copper laminate
  5. Printed circuit board

(3) Is this a good or bad method of disseminating knowledge of electronics?
Maybe the intention was to introduce electronics to an audience with zero or little knowledge of electronics components and circuit design. The intention is to produce a working circuit without having to delve into an explanation of how the circuit works.

Also, by keeping the YouTube content quick and simple, at attracts a larger number of "Likes" which garnishes greater financial rewards.

If this is the intention, then it is a great disservice to potential electronics hobbyists and enthusiasts. A proper electronics design and construction project should begin with a circuit design, schematics, and explanation.

In summary, you should avoid following any such presentations of circuit design and construction.
Certainly it is simple to judge the circuit without ever building it! It is not a voltage regulator because first, there is o feedback path, and second, because there is no voltage reference.
It is only substituting a transistor for a higher power rated variable resistor. That circuit might be in the second week of the first level transistor circuits course.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
17,129
With a proper schematic, you can see more easily that it isn't even a voltage regulator:
1716997804638.png
I didn't bother adding the voltmeter. Those meters require 4-30V and draw something like 10mA.

EDIT: corrected position of R2.
 
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k1ng 1337

Joined Sep 11, 2020
1,020
I really like YouTube for learning new stuff but I have to search hard to find realistic information produced by professionals. The trouble for me personally is it's very rare to see someone post all their calculations and thought process. Partly it's because of the length of time required to produce a video but also because some of their methods are trial and error. I don't mess around with anything high voltage that I find on YouTube unless I do the calculations myself. My own method is to reverse engineer the circuit into a complete schematic with real components, calculate the transfer function as best I can, test it in LTspice and then try building it. I'm not an engineer so this is my own way to make sure what I'm doing is realistic and safe. That being said, YouTube and ChatGPT are excellent learning tools for basic circuits and introductory concepts but that's about it.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
19,422
Maybe now folks will understand why I call it the "cartoon channel".
Certainly there will be some good information in a few posts, but a whole lot of faked stuff or really unsafe circuits or just plain bad advice.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
5,078
Over 90% (for me) of what is on YT is junk. Use Google Images instead. Look at the schematics it finds and select the one you are interested in, go to its source for more in-depth information and discussion then breadboard and try it out to see if it fits your needs. There are legions of circuit books available but I find Google to be quicker and more up to date design wise. The trick is knowing what to ask Google and always use the word schematic or circuit in the query.
 
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