Will this work? Battery pack connected to laptop motherboard

Thread Starter

SethB

Joined Mar 30, 2021
31
I am so aggravated lol.

I got the manufacturer's charger to work without the center pin. It would show "plugged in" and would leave the battery at 1%.

I got the second Krisdonia Power supply, and it does not work with both of them in parallel. It still shuts off after 30 seconds.

What is really strange, is there is still voltage through the wires. I have the wires exposed still (from doing a dry run of parallel batteries) and when I connect my volt meter across, it reads 19.9V. So the battery packs appear to be staying on, the laptop is just ignoring them. Is the extra amp I am missing really the problem? Considering with two Krisdonia Power Supplies in parallel, I should be able to reach 9.4A max. And from what someone else mentioned, you should always overshoot your required amps, which is 10.3A.

I think I should just give this up. But am also very curious as to what the issue is here. Lol.

Thanks all for the guidance and help along the way.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,212
My guess is it has nothing to do with the available amount of power, it's the laptop that is deciding to stop working with the power supply because it cannot communicate with it.
 

Thread Starter

SethB

Joined Mar 30, 2021
31
My guess is it has nothing to do with the available amount of power, it's the laptop that is deciding to stop working with the power supply because it cannot communicate with it.
But I got the stock charger to work without the center pin making contact? Thats what confuses me..
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,212
Use a scope if you can, or just a volt meter if that's all you have, and monitor the wires of both the stock charger and your external battery packs and see if you can tell the difference. Maybe there's communication over the other two wires? Or maybe the voltage dips when running on the batteries? There's definitely a difference, you just need to figure out what that difference is.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
19,453
My guess is it has nothing to do with the available amount of power, it's the laptop that is deciding to stop working with the power supply because it cannot communicate with it.
That is indeed the type of thing that disreputable companies do so that they can force you to buy their overpriced products. HP is among the worst offenders. If you can get them a bit used for 5% of the original price it makes sense. But I would not buy any HP computer product for the new price.
 

Thread Starter

SethB

Joined Mar 30, 2021
31
My guess is it has nothing to do with the available amount of power, it's the laptop that is deciding to stop working with the power supply because it cannot communicate with it.
So I think you might be right. I remember using my friends charger (150W) and it worked just fine. Her charger was a stock HP charger. I am pushing about 188 watts with my dual power bank setup, so its not the wattage.
Use a scope if you can, or just a volt meter if that's all you have, and monitor the wires of both the stock charger and your external battery packs and see if you can tell the difference. Maybe there's communication over the other two wires? Or maybe the voltage dips when running on the batteries? There's definitely a difference, you just need to figure out what that difference is.
I would love to use an oscilloscope however I do not have one lol. But yes, there could be signals being sent through the positive/negative leads on the battery.
That is indeed the type of thing that disreputable companies do so that they can force you to buy their overpriced products. HP is among the worst offenders. If you can get them a bit used for 5% of the original price it makes sense. But I would not buy any HP computer product for the new price.
Yeah. I bought it used. BestBuy has this gaming laptop for 900, I got it on OfferUp for 640, with upgraded RAM. I love the laptop, but I wish the CPU was a bit better.


I ended up getting another HP from Walmart that has a 45W charger. If this charger powers/charges my laptop, it is 100% the communication thing.

In the end, I bought this laptop for using it away from mains. It has an estimated 11Hr runtime. Was about the same as my gaming laptop, has no dedicated graphics card, but a better CPU. I figured to get what I want, I have to bite the bullet.

HOWEVER :D
If the 45W charger can charge my laptop. I am going to purchase another charger from ebay and tear it apart (after confirming it works with my gaming laptop) and see if I can determine the electronics inside to get the power supplies working. There is circuitry that communicates with the computer inside the transformer (my guess is its DC current powering this circuitry and not AC current) so if I power this circuitry with my battery pack, and the communication can occur, it theoretically should work. Plus I enjoy projects so this will be fun.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
19,453
So I think you might be right. I remember using my friends charger (150W) and it worked just fine. Her charger was a stock HP charger. I am pushing about 188 watts with my dual power bank setup, so its not the wattage.

I would love to use an oscilloscope however I do not have one lol. But yes, there could be signals being sent through the positive/negative leads on the battery.

Yeah. I bought it used. BestBuy has this gaming laptop for 900, I got it on OfferUp for 640, with upgraded RAM. I love the laptop, but I wish the CPU was a bit better.


I ended up getting another HP from Walmart that has a 45W charger. If this charger powers/charges my laptop, it is 100% the communication thing.

In the end, I bought this laptop for using it away from mains. It has an estimated 11Hr runtime. Was about the same as my gaming laptop, has no dedicated graphics card, but a better CPU. I figured to get what I want, I have to bite the bullet.

HOWEVER :D
If the 45W charger can charge my laptop. I am going to purchase another charger from ebay and tear it apart (after confirming it works with my gaming laptop) and see if I can determine the electronics inside to get the power supplies working. There is circuitry that communicates with the computer inside the transformer (my guess is its DC current powering this circuitry and not AC current) so if I power this circuitry with my battery pack, and the communication can occur, it theoretically should work. Plus I enjoy projects so this will be fun.
I do not predict much success in being able to separate and use that portion of the circuit separately. For starters, the ciecuit wa designed to be hacker resistant, and second, the electreonis is very tightly packed, and it is all very small, in addition.
 

Thread Starter

SethB

Joined Mar 30, 2021
31
I do not predict much success in being able to separate and use that portion of the circuit separately. For starters, the ciecuit wa designed to be hacker resistant, and second, the electreonis is very tightly packed, and it is all very small, in addition.
Yes, but that is what makes it fun. Theoretically all I need to do is pass a current through it and it should work. It is just a matter of finding where to pass the current through.
 
Top