Why does electrodynamics say that the electron cannot rotate around the nucleus?

Thread Starter

Motanache

Joined Mar 2, 2015
540
"so where are you on the answer to this question ? "

It doesn't matter how we understand the reality of the electron, no one has seen and will not see an electron.
What matters is to get something useful out of this (from theory from imagination).

I started my PhD with enthusiasm and high grades.
And they didn't let me present it to the public because I failed the preliminary presentation in college.

I considered not writing out of respect for you.
We influence each other and I am the spread sad and a bad example.


After that I realized that I had accumulated knowledge that I had to use somehow. I can no longer talk to people in the scientific world.
I no longer have the equipment I had.

I only have electronic components in one corner of my room like many of you have.
Thank you for the civilized discussion.

I'm a dreamer, I'm not saying the clear theory because you already know it ... and just memorizing something seems very boring to me.


My field of activity was called Ion beam analysis ("IBA") With Particle-induced X-ray emission or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) subdomain.
A group of Canadians do this even ... on the planet Mars (a space probe).

I understood several methods of analyzing the chemical elements in a sample.
You can even get 3D images of microscopic bodies.

I no longer have any professional equipment so the chances of success are low.

The crazy question I asked myself is whether we can analyze a sample using the magnetic field from a coil.
Of course there is .. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, most commonly known as NMR,
Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) or electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy .... And so on

But that's not what I mean.

I don't want to be discouraged, let's assume that we haven't said anything so far.
Nuclear magnetic resonance NMR, not many substances give an absorption response of the electromagnetic field of the order of MHz, (Of course in a strong magnetic field that changes the energy levels of the electron- hyperfine structure.)

1. I want to think of a simple method to analyze what chemical elements a sample has using electromagnetic fields
2. It would be good to know the depth in the sample where the chemical element is.


As a joke: It's like in Anton Chekhov. Ward No. 6 Where the doctor becomes a patient.....
My first supervisor did not have his PhD completed and I repeated his story......
He advised me to accept the collaboration with my professor and I regret it.

I would like somehow make the things learned and the time wasted not to be useless.
 

Thread Starter

Motanache

Joined Mar 2, 2015
540
" There will be an attractive magnetic force that is overwhelmed by the electric repulsive force, so the net force is repulsive. "
Then this is relativity.
That is, if you are in the reference system of the two electrons , they do not move, so relative to you they do not attract (besides repulsion).

If you stay and the electrons run away from you, relative to you, attractive forces appear to them (besides repulsion.)
 

Delta Prime

Joined Nov 15, 2019
1,311
The crazy question I asked myself is whether we can analyze a sample using the magnetic field from a coil.
“We are all agreed that your theory is crazy. The question which divides us is whether it is crazy enough to have a chance of being correct. My own feeling is that it is not crazy enough.”
― Niels Bohr.
I've been waiting 10 years for the right moment to use that one.Thank you!
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
9,280
That is, if you are in the reference system of the two electrons , they do not move, so relative to you they do not attract (besides repulsion).

If you stay and the electrons run away from you, relative to you, attractive forces appear to them (besides repulsion.)
Not quite, it is actually a reduction in the repulsion, due to the shortening of distances in the direction of motion, which makes the electric field non symmetrical. To the viewer it is equivalent to the addition of an attractive force, much like the centrifugal force in a rotating frame.

Bob
 
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