which kind of motor use for to make Anemometer ?

Thread Starter

Hardik Aghara

Joined Jan 25, 2016
3
I am work on my project. into market, anemometer is very costly so that i think made by myself. please anyone give me right information.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,933
Anemometer usually does not involve a motor.
I personally would not use one because of the inertia for one thing.
It is much easier to make or obtain a slotted disk and use a slot opto for pulse generation, the rod that carries the vane cups is held by a simple bearing and the bottom of the rod rests on a small ball bearing for friction-less operation.
You can either use a LM2907 or a micro processor for the counter/display.
Max.
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
Anemometer usually does not involve a motor.
I personally would not use one because of the inertia for one thing.
It is much easier to make or obtain a slotted disk and use a slot opto for pulse generation, the rod that carries the vane cups is held by a simple bearing and the bottom of the rod rests on a small ball bearing for friction-less operation.
You can either use a LM2907 or a micro processor for the counter/display.
Max.
An awful lot of magazine project anemometers use motors because they're much easier to get hold of than the expensive parts the TS is objecting to.

I'd go for the head stepper from a 3.5" FDD - they're small and light with tiny inertia. But it probably take careful design to make them sturdy enough for heavy weather.

These days; CD/DVD head positioners are probably easier to get, but they're simple brush motors - the relation between RPM and voltage isn't as good as counting pulses from a stepper.

Various steppers from printers are a possibility - they're sturdy, but have a lot of inertia and cogging.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,933
Personally I would Never consider a stepper, it has holding torque even when non-powered.
For my money I don't think you can beat a slotted disc, cheap and easier to make or obtain than a motor with way lower inertia.
Also very simple to convert to RPM.
Max.
.
 
Last edited:

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
Personally I would Never consider a stepper, it has holding torque even when non-powered.
For my money I don't think you can beat a slotted disc, cheap and easier to make or obtain than a motor with way lower inertia.
Also very simple to convert to RPM.
Max.
.
Easy if you've got a machine shop - off the shelf parts sturdy enough are probably the expensive bits the TS isn't keen on.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,933
Easy if you've got a machine shop - off the shelf parts sturdy enough are probably the expensive bits the TS isn't keen on.
The very first one I made did not involve a machine shop, made the old fashioned way with hand tools!
(Later versions involved a Picmicro).
It was for my kids local school for their science class, it had to go on the roof, so a large food container with a sealed lid was used and the output feed went to the lab for the analogue moving coil meter.
Calibrated by placing it on a roof rack on my Ford Zephyr!
The OP evidently has a budget problem, if so this is a very low cost solution.
Max.
 
Last edited:

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,012
Easy if you've got a machine shop - off the shelf parts sturdy enough are probably the expensive bits the TS isn't keen on.
I used a skateboard axle and bearing from a scrap axle, I painted black and white quadrants on a CD (or DVD) as a flat mounting plate to fit over the axle. I added two red plastic solo cups mounted to a stick. Mounted stick to DVD.

Added IR emitter next to PhotoTransistor with a piece of heat shrink in both to make sure I only got reflections of IR emitter. Mounted both within a few mm of white/black side if DVD.

Add 10k transistor in series with photoTransistor. Add 470 ohm in series with IR emitter.

Connect to 3-wire cable run back to tHe house with pulse counter. I used a PIC but any system is possible.

Note lack of machine shop.
If you decide to go with motor, use a brushed DC motor.
A brushed motor will make pulses as well. You just need an amplifier or comparitor to make your pulses logic-level.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,218
My earliest memories of these things was circa 1960 around the 5th grade. They were always popular at school science fairs. All of the ones I recall involved a DC Motor acting as a generator with a very low current analog meter movement. The motors were hacked off some gizmo from Japan and the meter movements could be had at the local Arrow Electronics store. Calibration was through a pot with the project on your fathers car roof on a relatively wind free day. The Bathroom Size Dixie Cups were used for the wind cups. Really, the simplest devices of the era.

Using a slotted or toothed wheel was a nice thought but back to those early 60s there was no easy way to count the pulses. :(

Ron
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,933
The one I referred to in #7 was around that time and there were no slot opto's, specialty IC's either, one had to use a photo cell and small light.
(just like the first quadrature encoders );)
The problem with a (DC) motor it has inertia that can make low readings a problem and of course it cannot be loaded electrically at all.
Max.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,218
The one I referred to in #7 was around that time and there were no slot opto's, specialty IC's either, one had to use a photo cell and small light.
(just like the first quadrature encoders );)
The problem with a (DC) motor it has inertia that can make low readings a problem and of course it cannot be loaded electrically at all.
Max.
Max I realize and appreciate that. The problem was at the time the average 5th grader had no clue as to how the more advanced circuits worked. Making the poing that when a small DC permanent magnet motor was turned backwards it was a generator was complex enough. The DC motors were as simple as could be. A motor, a few resistors with one a potentiometer and a meter movement. Things a 10 or 11 year old could grasp.

On a side note before I retired I worked with a much younger engineer who had kids active in science fairs. I frequently found him in my lab areas looking to my technicians for assistance and ideas with high school science fair projects. My conclusion became the idea was not to find creativity within the children but to see which kids had dads who were electrical engineering types and which dads had the best support at work. Anyway, the simple motor driven backward was the more popular design, especially for that 10 year old group in 1960.

Ron
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
I used a skateboard axle and bearing from a scrap axle, I painted black and white quadrants on a CD (or DVD) as a flat mounting plate to fit over the axle. I added two red plastic solo cups mounted to a stick. Mounted stick to DVD.

Added IR emitter next to PhotoTransistor with a piece of heat shrink in both to make sure I only got reflections of IR emitter. Mounted both within a few mm of white/black side if DVD.

Add 10k transistor in series with photoTransistor. Add 470 ohm in series with IR emitter.

Connect to 3-wire cable run back to tHe house with pulse counter. I used a PIC but any system is possible.

Note lack of machine shop.
.
No doubt I could scrounge something up from the junk box - but skate boards I don't have.

There's no knowing what resources the TS has to hand - having to machine parts to fit is the worst case scenario.
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,867
Top