What mean by higher resistance of stepper motor shaft while rotating it with hand?

Thread Starter

crazybuoy

Joined Sep 19, 2010
77
I found many small and big stepper motors in market.The shaft of some motors need a low power to rotate by hand, means it has low resistance and it moves easily by hand.

And some I found that their shaft need some more hand power to rotate its shaft, means it has more resistance.

Is the level of resistance also affects the torque power?
Has the motor with higher resistance more torque?
 

Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,223
some I found that their shaft need some more hand power to rotate its shaft, means it has more resistance.
Greater (input) torque implies greater PM field strength and, hence, greater 'back' EMF with increased interference to the resistance indication --- Please be advised that repurposed 'steppers' are a poor expedient for generators/instrumentation transducers...

Best regards
HP
 
Last edited:

RichardO

Joined May 4, 2013
2,271
Make sure that none of the motor wires are shorted to each other when doing the test. If the windings are shorted a lot more torque will be needed to tun the shaft because the motor is acting as a generator into a heavy electrical load.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,859
I found many small and big stepper motors in market.The shaft of some motors need a low power to rotate by hand, means it has low resistance and it moves easily by hand.
This is called the Residual torque is a result of the p.m flux acting on the stator poles.
As opposed to Holding torque which is the amount of torque required on the motor shaft at zero rpm that is required to move the shaft away from its holding position when powered at the rated current.
Max.
 
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