What is best mcu for industrial places?

Thread Starter

Vahid.VMB

Joined Apr 15, 2022
4
Hi there,
I want to use mcu for some automation, mostly i use mcu for controlling some stepper and servo motor and also some transistor but there is one problem that in my environment there is a lot of industrial 3 phases motors. What is the best mcu for my occasion? (Specially i can program it with python)
Note: the mcu should communicate with pc for transferring data.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,677
Welcome to AAC.

I know you asked about an MCU but I am going to suggest an SBC instead: the Raspberry PI. You will still have access to GPIO but you will also have many peripherals should you need them.

There are two reasons for this. First, you can use full blown Python and have a complete OS for other things. Second, there are quite a few options for industrially packaged RPis with various interfaces. This is an example.

1650031215339.gif
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
26,145
Welcome to AAC!

What you ask is a perfectly valid question which can be answered in about 1000 pages.
There are 1001 viable solutions and the task is how to narrow the field down to one or two candidates.
I can offer different approaches for industrial applications, (1) DIY and (2) consult an expert in the field.

If you want to take the (1) DIY route, then your task is to acquire enough knowledge and experience so that you can avoid taking the (2) route.

Here is what you would need at the basic minimum:

1) Basic knowledge of electronics
2) Basic knowledge of computers, programming and software development
3) Basic knowledge of microcontroller design and application
4) Some working experience with all of the above
5) Basic knowledge and experience with industrial electronics and control

The challenge is up to you to choose where you want to begin and how far you want to go.
Good luck on your journey!
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
5,169
I use NXP LPCxxxx microcontrollers in noisy environments adjacent to 125Amp contactors, phase-fired thyristor battery chargers up to 90A and such like, and they never have any trouble with interference. I suspect most similar microcontrollers will behave about the same. It is much more down to the decoupling and filtering of the power supply, and connections to the board than the microcontroller itself.
However, the SWD debugging device supplied by NXP is quite susceptible to interference, and has to be reconnected almost every time a contactor changes state.
 

Thread Starter

Vahid.VMB

Joined Apr 15, 2022
4
Welcome to AAC.

I know you asked about an MCU but I am going to suggest an SBC instead: the Raspberry PI. You will still have access to GPIO but you will also have many peripherals should you need them.

There are two reasons for this. First, you can use full blown Python and have a complete OS for other things. Second, there are quite a few options for industrially packaged RPis with various interfaces. This is an example.

Can i use one raspberry Pi 4 and a few raspberry Pi pico? Because my i/o pin is above than 130
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
9,745
I like the RPi as a development tool but it's not on my list for industrial applications. The Linux on an SD card file corruption has bitten me more than once and you really need to cocoon the RPi board from the outside world because that Broadcom SoC set-top chip is not robust like a 5V PIC controller to pin and power abuses. Most of us have put a PIC in backwards in the socket, watched it get hot as hell, flipped it and it still worked.

https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/te...i-isnt-a-good-choice-for-commercial-products/
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
4,141
In out industrial control products, most I/Os are via opto-isolators. And the power supplies are 24V to 5V isolated switch mode.
One thing I have done is to use a lot of power supply decoupling caps.
For networking, always run shielded data cable with correct terminations, and not beside motor cables if that is possible.

For extra noisy places, isolated serial comms helps a lot.
I like the Mornsun products.
https://www.mornsun-power.com/html/products/48/rs-485-transceiver-module.html
This is a potted version of their RS485 driver. There is quite a range.
MorsunRS485_Potted.png

With proper design, there is no reason an Arduino could not do the job if that is what you are already using.
 

strantor

Joined Oct 3, 2010
5,968
Yes i use Arduino but it’s hanged and freezes
See this:
It is much more down to the decoupling and filtering of the power supply, and connections to the board than the microcontroller itself.
The arduino board that you're likely using is not an industrial device. It's a hobbyist dev board. You can get industrial versions of Arduino like this. They use the same microcontroller. The difference is in all the circuits apart from the microcontroller. Shielding, power supply, etc. and in the higher voltage inputs and outputs. It's like how a sports car and a work truck might have the same V8 engine (MCU). The sports car is not going to tow 16,000lbs like the truck will.

When you ask about "which MCU" ("engine") I can't help but wonder if what you really mean is "which dev board" ("sports car") And if that's the case, my answer is "none of them." Use an industrial device ("truck") for industrial applications, or design your own industrial device if you must.
 

GetDeviceInfo

Joined Jun 7, 2009
2,096
The problem isn’t in any specific mcu, but rather it’s local operating environment, and I/O isolation. The previously suggested Andino looks smart. For the cost of used SLCs, I wouldn’t waste too much time on homegrown.
 
Top