Trying to identify type of plug, in order to connect to standard U.S. 120

Thread Starter

Stoutcat

Joined Mar 10, 2017
7
Hoping this is the right place in the right forum for asking a question like this.

I have a non-US plug that I need an adapter for. Does anyone recognize this type, with bulges at the base of each prong?

IMG_2367.JPG IMG_2368.JPG IMG_2371.JPG IMG_2372.JPG

I'll be grateful for any information.

Stoutcat
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,152
I've never seen one like that here in the U.S., although it looks like it would probably work. Does the device you want to plug in have any information on it regarding voltage, watts, amps, anything?
 

Thread Starter

Stoutcat

Joined Mar 10, 2017
7
Thanks for the response. It came with (and is part of) a 1950s-era expresso machine from Italy. You may be able to see from the photos above that the other end has stamped on it 10/250 on one side, and AC on the other. We have tried mightily to get it to plug into a standard outlet, but the bulges on the base of the prongs make that simply impossible.

Any thoughta?
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,867
The one is a standard two prong 110 - 120 VAC 10 amp light duty plug.

The socket though sort of looks like an old style ceramic kitchen appliance sockets like the old electric griddles, flying pans, skillets and whatnot used back in the 1930's through 1960's - 1970's.

Without hands on I would almost say it could be a old 32 VDC appliance socket from the 1930's -1940's era as well.
 

Thread Starter

Stoutcat

Joined Mar 10, 2017
7
The one is a standard two prong 110 - 120 VAC 10 amp light duty plug.
Except that it's not, I swear. Try as we might, it will NOT go into a standard outlet.

The socket has stamped on it 10/250 on one side, and AC on the other.

Help!
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,152
Thanks for the response. It came with (and is part of) a 1950s-era expresso machine from Italy. You may be able to see from the photos above that the other end has stamped on it 10/250 on one side, and AC on the other. We have tried mightily to get it to plug into a standard outlet, but the bulges on the base of the prongs make that simply impossible.

Any thoughta?
Is there any information on the machine itself?

There are two problems here: Making the mechanical connection and making the electrical connection. I believe it will be easy to find a mechanical solution. That might include just replacing the cord with one that fits properly on both ends. Worst case, you make one yourself.

The electrical connection is a bigger concern. That machine expects some particular voltage and we don't know what that is. Just plugging it in without knowing risks blowing it up.
 

Thread Starter

Stoutcat

Joined Mar 10, 2017
7
On the unit itself, it says:
Vesuviana
BREV
415468
MADE IN ITALY

The fact that the "made in Italy" is actually in English suggests that this was not made for the European market... maybe?

On the porcelain female end, it is stamped 10/250 on one side, and AC on the other.

Thanks.
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,867
Except that it's not, I swear. Try as we might, it will NOT go into a standard outlet.

The socket has stamped on it 10/250 on one side, and AC on the other.
Assuming the device that cored belongs to uses 120 VAC or something close to it just cut the odd end off and put a new one that does work on it.

The trip to the hardware store to buy a $2 lamp cord end or a whole new properly sized cord and putting the other end on it will take way longer than the replacing or switching the ends on the cord will.
 

Thread Starter

Stoutcat

Joined Mar 10, 2017
7
Assuming the device that cored belongs to uses 120 VAC or something close to it just cut the odd end off and put a new one that does work on it.
That's the trouble, I can't assume that. Husband who is an engineer and a technician says one should never try to jury-rig a power cord like that... We need to find out what the plug is--why the damn bulges?. But thanks for the suggestion.
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,867
That's the trouble, I can't assume that. Husband who is an engineer and a technician says one should never try to jury-rig a power cord like that... We need to find out what the plug is--why the damn bulges?. But thanks for the suggestion.
Then he should also be intelligent enough to figure out what the device said cord goes to uses for voltage and current and thusly act accordingly. But what do I know. I too am a technician and have and electrical engineering background (in power systems plus other areas) and do and have done such work for a career for 20+ years. :p

As for putting new ends on a cord that's a standard and acceptable practice. If it wasn't there wouldn't be replacement cord ends in every hardware isle of every store everywhere in the world available for anyone to buy and use as they see fit. ;)

Methinks your husband is feeding you a line so as to not have to fix your whatever it is. :rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,152
That's the trouble, I can't assume that. Husband who is an engineer and a technician says one should never try to jury-rig a power cord like that... We need to find out what the plug is--why the damn bulges?. But thanks for the suggestion.
Yeah, I googled around yesterday trying to find a picture of a plug like yours. I couldn't find a single one. I'm still of the opinion that it's meant for U.S. use and just doesn't fit the receptacles you have but might fit others.

Suggestion: If your husband doesn't mind experimenting, and you really want to avoid risking the machine by plugging it it, he could put a lightbulb in series with the power to the espresso machine. Like a 60W or 100W lamp. This will limit the power to the machine, which I believe is just a heater? (Mine is - no moving parts.) If it behaves reasonably well, you can remove the bulb and try it with direct connection to mains.

It looks a little bit like those bulges might have been inside the plug at one time, but pulled out when the plug was hot. Measure the length of the prongs.
 
Last edited:

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
That's the trouble, I can't assume that. Husband who is an engineer and a technician says one should never try to jury-rig a power cord like that... We need to find out what the plug is--why the damn bulges?. But thanks for the suggestion.
Someone else suggested the possibility of a 32V appliance - so look for a specification plate and make sure!

32V was common in rural America at one time, often referred to as; "farmyard supply" - somewhere around the 30s there was a magazine series devoted to things like rebuilding car dynamos for that purpose.

Any markings on the plug/socket you have are likely to be the maximum safe rating for the plug/socket - not the appliance.

My instinct would be to cut the old plug off and make a proper professional job of fitting something modern, its probably safer than mucking about with travel adaptors - but unless you can find a specification plate and verify the appliance is compatible with your supply, I'd play safe and send it to recycling.
 

Thread Starter

Stoutcat

Joined Mar 10, 2017
7
Well, all you helpful folks, thanks for all your suggestions. I feel like an idiot. I was polishing the aluminum base of the machine and came across a small cartouche at the back of the base which was stamped -- quite clearly -- 110V, which I had completely missed. *sigh* So apparently all we have to do is cut off the old plug, and attach a new one.

Thank you all for not making me feel too stupid for asking such a basic question. Clearly I'm quite capable of doing that myself!

Many thanks.
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,867
Well, all you helpful folks, thanks for all your suggestions. I feel like an idiot. I was polishing the aluminum base of the machine and came across a small cartouche at the back of the base which was stamped -- quite clearly -- 110V, which I had completely missed. *sigh* So apparently all we have to do is cut off the old plug, and attach a new one.

Thank you all for not making me feel too stupid for asking such a basic question. Clearly I'm quite capable of doing that myself!

Many thanks.

Your welcome! And I hope you did a little victory dance in front of your husband too! :D
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
Well, all you helpful folks, thanks for all your suggestions. I feel like an idiot. I was polishing the aluminum base of the machine and came across a small cartouche at the back of the base which was stamped -- quite clearly -- 110V, which I had completely missed. *sigh* So apparently all we have to do is cut off the old plug, and attach a new one.

Thank you all for not making me feel too stupid for asking such a basic question. Clearly I'm quite capable of doing that myself!

Many thanks.
You should see some of the things we get asked!!! - anyone would think a Darwin award was something to brag about.............
 
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