The IC in Arduino Due is getting heated and boards stops working?

Thread Starter

Akhilesh Peddu

Joined Jul 5, 2017
12
When I am trying to run the motor using Arduino Due board to give the control signals, the board is getting damaged. This has happened twice now. Initially, it was working for 15 days on both the boards but suddenly the IC of Arduino gets heated up and board stops working.

Please help me in finding the reason.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
19,003
hi AP,
How is the motor control connected to the Arduino? and do you have back emf diode protection across the motor.?
E
 

Thread Starter

Akhilesh Peddu

Joined Jul 5, 2017
12
hi AP,
How is the motor control connected to the Arduino? and do you have back emf diode protection across the motor.?
E
The Arduino ground is connected to the power supply ground of the motor/converter. Some electronic input signals are given to the converter of the motor. No diode connection in between Arduino and converter.
 

shteii01

Joined Feb 19, 2010
4,644
It is likely that you connected the motor to the Due incorrectly.
Due can run toy motor, but it is not designed to run any real motor directly.
Post a drawing of how things are connected.
 

shteii01

Joined Feb 19, 2010
4,644
Using the programming port connecting it to the laptop.
So. Powered through USB port. Assuming USB 2, you could draw as much as 500 mA so power delivery should be ok.
The only thing left unknown are the IC on controller that need 3.3V and 5V. Maybe they are ok, maybe not.
This is all assuming that motor and controller combo are fine and don't need to be investigated.
 

takao21203

Joined Apr 28, 2012
3,702
EMF from big motors just loves to travel through components as if they would be conductors, destroying components on the low voltage side.

Isolate the low voltage side fully, use proper protection for IC supply rails.
 

Thread Starter

Akhilesh Peddu

Joined Jul 5, 2017
12
EMF from big motors just loves to travel through components as if they would be conductors, destroying components on the low voltage side.

Isolate the low voltage side fully, use proper protection for IC supply rails.
By low voltage side, did you mean ground or the complete Arduino circuit?
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
4,496
It is an better idea to power the Arduino via a regulator off the motor supply.
Sometimes running from a laptop can cause problems because of the leakage from the mains via the laptop plug pack. I have blown a system up that way.

What is the controller? Do you have data for the motor controller?
It is odd that you need to supply the controller with 5v and 3.3V
More info than you have supplied is needed if you want some help.
 

Thread Starter

Akhilesh Peddu

Joined Jul 5, 2017
12
It is odd that you need to supply the controller with 5v and 3.3V
More info than you have supplied is needed if you want some help.
We have modified the controller, so we need to give signals to the ic's which require 5V and 3.3V supply like 7408 ic.
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
4,496
Do you have info about the controller, like a make and model and preferably a circuit diagram?
It is really hard to help without any real information to go on.
What is the actual circuit connection and why did you have to modify the controller?
What are you actually driving in the controller? (PWM/Direction???)
You say...
We have modified the controller, so we need to give signals to the ic's which require 5V and 3.3V supply like 7408 ic.
What do you mean by "signals"?
Is this just the supply voltages or the drive signals from the Arduino.
You are not showing any level shifters in you diagram so the "signals" from the Arduino will only be 5V levels.

Maybe you could opto isolate the signals, but we need to know what you are doing.

Please give us something to work with! so far, your information tells us really nothing.
 

Thread Starter

Akhilesh Peddu

Joined Jul 5, 2017
12
We are actually controlling two motors simultaneously. The accelerator input to both the motors is coded in the Arduino and is sent to the individual controller boards.
We are also reading the Hall sensor signal using Arduino to calculate the speed of the motor.

We are using the 5V signal and some input and output pins.
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
4,496
You are still not giving me any real info!
This is like pulling teeth!
How about some real information, like, are you using digital or analog signals?
What is the controller?
What are the mods?
Why do you need to supply 5V and 3.3V from the Arduino? The controller should supply the Arduino, not the other way around.
If you have modified the controller, surely you know the answers to these questions.

Check that you are not trying to draw more current from the Arduino that the ports can drive.
Also, make sure that the inputs to the Arduino do not go over 5V.
Either of these can cause your problems.
Some real circuits of your input and outputs would help to resolve this.

If you can opto isolate the inputs and outputs, and have the 5V and 3.3V power supplied from the motor supply, and the Arduino supply isolated that will help too.
 
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