Step down output current

Thread Starter

ouaburst

Joined Dec 2, 2021
6
I have access to RSP-1500-15, a 1.5KW single output enclosed type AC/DC power supply.
Input 100-240VAC 20 A 50/60Hz.
Output +15V - 100A
For more information about the product: https://www.meanwell.com/webapp/product/search.aspx?prod=RSP-1500

My goal is to step down the output current to different values, e.g. 10A, 20A,...,100A by using a step down circuit.
I don't know how to achieve that.
Is there any step down circuit that I can buy?
I did a Google search but I didn't find what I am looking for.

Thanks.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
14,729
hi oua,
Welcome to AAC
I guess you know that a load connected to the power supply output will only draw the current required to operate the circuit load?

What are you planning to do with the PSU.?

E
 

Thread Starter

ouaburst

Joined Dec 2, 2021
6
What are you planning to do with the PSU.?
Well, the output cables will be connected to two cathodes, one + and the other -.
These two cathodes are then submerged in a liquid and the result will be a chemical reaction.
The output current needs to be adjustable at the interval 0 - 100A.
I don't know how to accomplish that.
Maybe it is not possible...
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
4,322
Then you need a variable voltage supply with current limiting. Look up current limiter circuits, you can add on on to your 15V supply.

Bob
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
14,729
Hi,
OK,
I do not know which liquids you are using but is it possible for a 15Vdc source to produce a 100Amp current through the liquid.?

E
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
17,646
Don't you mean that you have a cathode and an anode; and that the anode is more positive than the cathode? The load is still going to take what it needs and no more.
 

Thread Starter

ouaburst

Joined Dec 2, 2021
6
Hi,
OK,
I do not know which liquids you are using but is it possible for a 15Vdc source to produce a 100Amp current through the liquid.?

E
I don't know either but the actual source produces 100A current through it.
The customer has already a PSU that is almost 30 years old.
The old PSU outputs different current values and it is controlled by a CNC control unit.
He wants to replace the old PSU.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
1,635
"" I don't know either but the actual source produces 100A current through it. ""

The Power-Supply may have the "CAPABILITY" of supplying 100A, at a particular Voltage.

What is the maximum Voltage that the Old-Power-Supply can deliver at 100-Amps ?

Is the Maximum-Voltage-Output adjustable on the Old-Power-Supply ?

What's wrong with the Old-Power-Supply ?

What type of Control-Signal is needed to set the limit on the Maximum-Current ?

How much is this Power-Supply expected to cost ?
.
.
.
 

ronsimpson

Joined Oct 7, 2019
1,760
Maybe he wants a adjustable current limit circuit. Maybe several different ones. Then each output will be up to 15V and less than 10A or 20A or what you set it for. Then you can have one for each load.
Just a wild guess.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
17,646
I don't know either but the actual source produces 100A current through it.
The customer has already a PSU that is almost 30 years old.
The old PSU outputs different current values and it is controlled by a CNC control unit.
He wants to replace the old PSU.
You might not know the precise answer, but it is kind of important. There is a difference between current control and current limiting. In one of those situations the voltage is uncontrolled and in the other there is an attempt to maintain a constant voltage (potential difference) between the electrodes until the current limit is reached and then the voltage is lowered to maintain a constant current. Since this power supply is used in a machine, a random replacement may or may not perform the way you expect.
 
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