Special tool for knurled nut

Thread Starter

peterdeco

Joined Oct 8, 2019
465
I recently received 1/8" (3.5mm) jacks from China. They have a knurled mounting nut unlike any I've seen before. There are no slots in them for our tool to tighten. Does anyone know where to get a tool for this? Thank you.
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Thread Starter

peterdeco

Joined Oct 8, 2019
465
Thanks Y but they get mounted in a recess. Pliers won't fit. They need something like a tube with slots inside to slip into the slots in the nut. I can't find anything like this.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,525
Thanks Y but they get mounted in a recess. Pliers won't fit. They need something like a tube with slots inside to slip into the slots in the nut. I can't find anything like this.
I think I would make my own using an impression from the recess and nut. I might try using JB Weld Steelstick and silicone as a release compound. The epoxy putty will retain the impression pretty well so it doesn't have to be left in to cure.
 

Thread Starter

peterdeco

Joined Oct 8, 2019
465
Thank Albert but we use 10,000 pieces/year of these things. It's not practical to cut each one. We tried various hex nuts on them and even the thread is different.
 

zophas

Joined Jul 16, 2021
159
Thank Albert but we use 10,000 pieces/year of these things. It's not practical to cut each one. We tried various hex nuts on them and even the thread is different.
If you are buying that many then surely your supplier should be able to tell you what thread it is and maybe even assist in making a tool for you.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
25,930
Here is what I would try.

Find a hex nut driver that fits over your knurled nut and into the recessed hole.
Fill the cavity with 3D printer ABS filament. Heat the end to soften the ABS and push it on to the knurled nut.
As an alternative, use J-B Weld epoxy. Insert the knurled nut before the epoxy hardens. Jiggle it around as it cures in order to loosen it.


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AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
9,964
We tried various hex nuts on them and even the thread is different.
Different for you, maybe, but the odds of this connector having a completely non-standard (both non-imperial and non-metric) thread are zero. Not the answer you're looking for, but: try more.

ak
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
9,327
Different for you, maybe, but the odds of this connector having a completely non-standard (both non-imperial and non-metric) thread are zero. Not the answer you're looking for, but: try more.

ak
That's the best answer yet. Screws and nuts are available in many more thread sizes than what a hardware store carries.
 
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