Speaker Power Specifications

Thread Starter

froilan.1

Joined Jan 26, 2021
4
Hey guys. I'm newbie to this forum i don't know if this is the right forum if not pardon. I'm here to ask what is rhe specifications of this speaker i can't see specifications at the back but i taken some pictures
i am planing to rebuild this one. this speaker is from my deceased father. thank you in advance.
Spider Slot - 45mm
Voice coil slot - 35mm
Diaphragm & Suspension - 9 Inches and 3/4

IMG20210126133424.jpgIMG20210126133407.jpgIMG20210126133314.jpgIMG20210126133139.jpgIMG20210126133131.jpg
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
5,992
Welcome to AAC.

You can measure the speaker coil resistance with a meter. That should tell you the impedance of the speaker, whether it's 8Ω, 4 or 2Ω. Given that it's your father's speaker, it's probably 8Ω, but it could be 4Ω. The spacing of the voice coil will suggest a max wire diameter that the coil could be built from. You'll have to do some math to figure out what length of wire will give you the desired resistance, then how many wraps around the spindle to determine the max size of wire that can be used. Then, depending on that wire diameter you should be able to determine the max wattage that speaker can safely handle. Sorry, I don't know of any sites that could provide that information. Maybe YouTube will turn up a video on how to recoil a speaker. I'm just not that interested to see if that's so.

Good luck.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,871
Welcome to AAC!
Spider Slot - 45mm
Voice coil slot - 35mm
Diaphragm & Suspension - 9 Inches and 3/4
Speaker dimensions have little correlation to speaker resistance and power capability.

There's some black magic in the audiophile world. They talk of peak wattage, oxygen free copper cables, being able to hear how wire splices affect audio quality, and a lot of other nonsense.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
3,316
Actually, you could get a rough idea of the power handling by determinig the voltage and current that cause the maximum excursion of the cone. However, I would not bet my life on how to compute it that way.

Bob
 

Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
3,201
You cannot fix that destroyed speaker, replace it. It is large so it is called a "woofer" that produces low frequencies.
But a speaker has many specifications that determine its enclosure size and type (sealed or vented).
If the specifications of the speaker do not match the enclosure then the low frequencies might be missing or might be boosted and sound "boomy".

I think your destroyed woofer is 10" or 12".
Partsexpress.com sell many good speakers for fairly good prices. Their lowest price 12" woofer specifications are here:
 

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BobaMosfet

Joined Jul 1, 2009
1,776
Audioguru again is right.... You cannot fix the cone on that speaker, you don't have to knowledge or toolset or materials.

Best to purchase a replacement.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
560
I realize that you probably have an emotional attachment to these Speakers,
but coming from a totally pragmatic viewpoint,
and my having designed many different types, sizes and power levels, (up to rock concert level),
of high fidelity, and questionable fidelity, Speakers,
I would advise you to forget about trying to do anything with these speakers.
Maybe the cabinets are still in reasonable condition, if that is the case,
you may want to just replace the Woofers with generic replacements from Parts-Express.
The speakers that you would like to repair CAN NOT BE REPAIRED, and they are not of a high enough
quality to warrant anything other than a non-ceremonious toss into the nearest trash can.
Almost any replacement speaker that you find at Parts Express will be an improvement.

Your Speakers are at the mid-range of generic "consumer-grade" junk.
They were custom manufactured in Asia for a large, Consumer Grade Appliance Manufacturer,
and may have odd dimensions.
This means that if you want to keep the Cabinets, and just replace the Woofers,
you may have to go with the next larger standard size of driver, and then enlarge the
driver cutout in the front of the cabinet to make it fit.
I know these things because I've done exactly what I am describing at least ~15 times over the years.

The Power-Handling capacity of these Woofers is in the range of less than ~50 Watts RMS, ~100 Watts Peak,
but obtaining speakers with identical power handling ratings is really not that important,
unless you intend to hammer them with a ~100-plus Watt Amp.
Like-wise, the Impedance Rating is largely irrelevant because it is very likely that these speakers do not
have a Low-Pass Crossover network, the frequency of which, would be changed if the Impedance of
the new spears that you select do not closely approximate the old Woofer's Impedance.
With these type of speakers, you would be hard-pressed to tell the difference even if it was wrong.

Here is a sorted list of practical replacement Woofers from Parts-Express,
any of which will work reasonably well.
https://www.parts-express.com/speak...diameter/10,12?powerhandlingrms=70.00to202.97

Notes to keep in Mind ..........
1) WITH SPEAKERS YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR, (sometimes less ),
but you may be quite happy with some of the cheaper speakers,
depending, of course, upon how discerning your ears are, and how deep your pockets are.

2) Bigger Magnets are almost always better than smaller ones, (except in the case of Neodymium Magnets).
Larger Magnets generally make the speaker more efficient, and higher in fidelity,
and are a loose indicator of power handling capability.

3) This list contains both 10" and 12" woofers, here's why .......
a) For improved Fidelity, go with a 10" woofer,
you may have to construct adapter rings to install them, if the hole in the Cabinets is too big.
b) The reason is that the Cabinet will have more interior volume compared to the size of the Speaker Cone Area.
This will lower the resonant frequency of the cabinet and produce smoother/lower Bass Frequencies.
c) If you want the LOUDEST OUTPUT go with a 12" Woofer with a
light-weight Paper Cone and Foam-Surround, and with the biggest Magnet.
d) The 12" woofers will tend to be boomy and obnoxious, but quite LOUD, and generally have lower fidelity,
this is not because 12" woofers are inherently bad, it's because it's virtually guaranteed that
your cabinets are TOO SMALL for an "inexpensive" 12" woofer.
Cheap Woofers NEED BIG CABINETS to sound reasonably good.
Very expensive 12" woofers can be made to work quite well with "too-small" cabinets,
but you probably don't have that much money to spend,
and they are generally not very efficient and require a lot of power.

4) For Higher Fidelity sound, make sure that you stuff the cabinets full of any kind of sound absorbing material.
Fiber-Glass building insulation is the best, but Pillow Stuffing, old Bath Towels, Rags, and similar stuff will work.
For the LOUDEST, most obnoxious, boomy Bass, leave the cabinets empty.

My personal choice would be the ........
Dayton Audio DC250-8 10" Classic Woofer
https://www.parts-express.com/Dayton-Audio-DC250-8-10-Classic-Woofer-295-315
This a very good "Bang-for-the-Buck" all around good performer for a very reasonable price of ~$30.oo.
This speaker may require that you fabricate an adapter ring so that they will fit your cabinets.
.
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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,787
I have seen the repair kits for speakers, but those are large high power expensive speakers. If you still have the original speaker cones with the voice coils then you could use the same voice coils and replace the cones. BUT it will not be easy or simple. The clearance between voice coil and the center pole is only 0.001 to0.003 inch, and about the same on the outside. That means that your voice coil form must be "perfectly cylindrical" and exactly the correct diameter. THEN the wire gets wound around it, onto a layer of fresh adhesive, and then back on top in a second layer, all perfectly flat, and not distorting the form at all. Then comes the hard part, which is positioning it perfectly around the center pole piecwe and attaching the replacement cone so that nothing rubs. Routing and connecting the voice coil leads is the simple part , done afrer all of the adhesive has set and it has been verified that nothing rubs. I have repaired a few high powered siren speakers so I am a bit familiar with the process.
 

Thread Starter

froilan.1

Joined Jan 26, 2021
4
I have seen the repair kits for speakers, but those are large high power expensive speakers. If you still have the original speaker cones with the voice coils then you could use the same voice coils and replace the cones. BUT it will not be easy or simple. The clearance between voice coil and the center pole is only 0.001 to0.003 inch, and about the same on the outside. That means that your voice coil form must be "perfectly cylindrical" and exactly the correct diameter. THEN the wire gets wound around it, onto a layer of fresh adhesive, and then back on top in a second layer, all perfectly flat, and not distorting the form at all. Then comes the hard part, which is positioning it perfectly around the center pole piecwe and attaching the replacement cone so that nothing rubs. Routing and connecting the voice coil leads is the simple part , done afrer all of the adhesive has set and it has been verified that nothing rubs. I have repaired a few high powered siren speakers so I am a bit familiar with the process.
i have the voice coil but the problem is it's not working i don't see any damage in the windings and that voice coil is customize by my father too
 

Thread Starter

froilan.1

Joined Jan 26, 2021
4
I have seen the repair kits for speakers, but those are large high power expensive speakers. If you still have the original speaker cones with the voice coils then you could use the same voice coils and replace the cones. BUT it will not be easy or simple. The clearance between voice coil and the center pole is only 0.001 to0.003 inch, and about the same on the outside. That means that your voice coil form must be "perfectly cylindrical" and exactly the correct diameter. THEN the wire gets wound around it, onto a layer of fresh adhesive, and then back on top in a second layer, all perfectly flat, and not distorting the form at all. Then comes the hard part, which is positioning it perfectly around the center pole piecwe and attaching the replacement cone so that nothing rubs. Routing and connecting the voice coil leads is the simple part , done afrer all of the adhesive has set and it has been verified that nothing rubs. I have repaired a few high powered siren speakers so I am a bit familiar with the process.
i have the voice coil but the problem is it's not working i don't see any damage in the windings and that voice coil is customize by my father too
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,787
i have the voice coil but the problem is it's not working i don't see any damage in the windings and that voice coil is customize by my father too
What do you mean by the voice coil is not working? You need to measure the resistance of the winding.
AND you need to understand how the electrical signal becomes sound, just how a speaker works. Then you will be able to understand how it goes back together.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
560
Guys.... You're Killin' me, this is painful to watch and read.
Oh well, I guess you have to just let people learn for themselves.:rolleyes:
There's no such thing as "customizing" a speaker Voice Coil,
especially on a speaker that originally cost around ~$7.oo to make.
Speakers are delicate, precision, tuned, devices,...... yes, even the cheap ones.
You can't "fix" them with glue and tape and some wire you had laying around and
expect them to magically work like brand-new.

Voice Coil alignment is extremely critical, and if you've never done it before,
and you don't have a dedicated "Re-Cone Kit" with detailed, step-by-step instructions,
you're just going to make a mess of things, and be disappointed.
.
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Thread Starter

froilan.1

Joined Jan 26, 2021
4
What do you mean by the voice coil is not working? You need to measure the resistance of the winding.
AND you need to understand how the electrical signal becomes sound, just how a speaker works. Then you will be able to understand how it goes back together.
here's some snapshot of the voice coil that isn't working i test the voice before is remove it's not working
 

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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,787
I see the image of the cone including the voice coil and I see that it does have the appearance of having had the cone replaced, but only the cone and not the voice coil or the portion that holds the voice coil in alignment. and the nice clean frames at the beginning of this thread tell me that the very vital part, the portion that mounts at the end of the voice coil and holds it in alignment with the center pole part, is gone. That makes repairing the speakers a much more complex task that would require an exact replacement cone and coil assembly and a great deal of very careful work. So IF you know the brand and model of the speaker and IF the manufacturer is willing and able to sell you the correct replacement cone and coil assemblies and if you are willing to spend that much effort and a fair amount of money then it could be done, and the rebuilt speakers MIGHT work.
Those frames can still be used as reminders of who used them, but not as sound reproducers.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
5,992
1) Why not just buy new?
2) Why are some saying it's not possible to fix?
3) Am I the only one to look up on YouTube how to fix it?
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,787
I watched the video and while some of it looked OK there were things left out, including connecting the voice coil and compelting the seal to keep the epoxy out of the voice coil clearance. But the biggest thing is that the cone was in perfect condition.
The cone on the speakers we saw was very damaged and the voice coils were ripped out of the cone. So repairing the TS speakers would need a whole new cone and VC assembly, which would be simpler to install but are quite probably not available. But research may show otherwise.
And quite a few say it can't be done because THEY could not do it. Of course they may not be able to do a lot of things.
 

Jon Hoover

Joined Oct 10, 2019
33
I have reconed many larger, professional PA speakers in the past. It's a long, tedious process but it can be done for quite a bit less money than buying a new one if you're repairing a $300-$400 JBL, EV, EAW, etc. The first thing you need to know is the exact make and model of the speaker. It doesn't look like that info is on the magnet so you might not get any farther than you already have. Once that is known, you need to find a complete recone kit from a reputable supplier. No eBay or 3rd party stuff is suggested. I used to use MWA in Arizona. https://www.mwaspeakerparts.com But, to buy from them, you need to be an experienced reconer, not a beginner. Then you need to have the proper glues. There were 4 different types of glue and hardeners that I had to keep in stock to properly glue the speakers. You also need proper thickness plastic shim material to accurately center the voice coil in the magnet gap. You also need the proper wire to attach the voice coil to the terminals. So, if you're willing to spend about $40 each for the recone kits, another $50 for the various glues and $20 more for the shims and the wires, then go for it. Also, you need to make sure that the center magnet pole piece hasn't shifted or your voice coil will rub and short out. But, these speakers appear to be inexpensive stamped frame ones of unknown origin. So, you would be much better off trying to find a similar sized replacement speaker to load back into the enclosure to get them playing again. I also like the Parts Express stuff. Excellent selection and quality. Good luck!
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
5,992
Have watched several video's now. They range from "Build your own voice coil" to replacing the coil with new. Replacing the entire horn and spider as well as the dust cover. Clearly it's doable. Just why the TS wants to rebuild such a small and old speaker is questionable. It has a small magnet and has probably weakened over the years. There's better speaker technology out there. So if for sentimental reasons - which the TS did say - one wants to rebuild a speaker - it can be done.

With Covid keeping us sequestered in our workshops why not rebuild?! Sure, a new one can be ordered and delivered, but this is the TS father's speaker. Somehow it means something to him/her.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
560
I saw it on the Internet, so it must be true !!!!
Well, some people are actually Tone-Deaf, it's a real thing,
so maybe those re-wound Voice Coils are worth a try ....... (Not)

I've Re-Coned more High-End E-V and Gauss-Cetek woofers than I care to remember back in the '80's,
and no matter how meticulous you are, 1 out of 4 will develop a Buzz, and it's the next to fail,
and those speakers had Dual Stacked Spiders with a factory installed phenolic mounting ring,
but of course, a huge BGW 1000 Watt Amp will do that to you after a while.
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