some basic doubts in my projects

Thread Starter

Kamesh P

Joined Dec 24, 2017
10
i have 1000v 10 amp bridge rectifier, what is 10 amp & 1000v means
Is it 10 amp is max current it give & is it 1000v constant voltage ?????


i have ac potentiometer, may i use it after bridge rectifier - dc voltage ????
may control dc voltage with potentiometer ????

help me sir...
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,837
i have 1000v 10 amp bridge rectifier, what is 10 amp & 1000v means
Is it 10 amp is max current it give & is it 1000v constant voltage ?????


i have ac potentiometer, may i use it after bridge rectifier - dc voltage ????
may control dc voltage with potentiometer ????

help me sir...

If you need to ask that question then you shouldn't be messing with 1000v, 10 amp rectifiers.

Unless, assuming you want to use more reasonable voltages and amperage. Those are max voltages.

And no you can't just connect a pot. You will need a voltage regulator.
 
Responding is going to be difficult. First, I'll send you here: http://www.hammondmfg.com/pdf/5c007.pdf

This goes over various designs of power supplies. 1000 V, 10 A rectifiers may have a larger voltage drop than 1 diode drop. But the 1000 V means peak inverse voltage. It's how much reverse voltage, the diode can be safely used. 10 A is usually an average current.

Is your "AC potentiometer" a Variac, or Variable Autotransformer?

Depending on your use, a Variac, fuse on the wiper, rectifier(s) and a capacitor can make an UNREGULATED power supply.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
24,390
10A is the maximum average current that the rectifier can safely carry.

All a rectifier does is conduct current in one direction (with a forward drop of around 0.7V for a silicon junction diode) and block the current in the other direction.
It has no other effect on the voltage or current.
The current is determined by the load added to the rectifier output.
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
8,310
10 A is the max current you can pass through the diodes continuously. That spec has a little margin built in, but it is best to limit the current to something below the spec. The diode will work at almost all currents less than 10 A, down to the milliamp level. At extremely low currents the diodes will stop conducting.

1000 V is the maximum continuous *reverse* voltage you can apply across the diodes. You can use the part in circuits with way less voltage, such as 12 V coming out of a small power transformer.

ak
 

Thread Starter

Kamesh P

Joined Dec 24, 2017
10
If you need to ask that question then you shouldn't be messing with 1000v, 10 amp rectifiers.

Unless, assuming you want to use more reasonable voltages and amperage. Those are max voltages.

And no you can't just connect a pot. You will need a voltage regulator.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

I have single phase 240v, 60Hz input AC supply, that input supply is regulated by 10000W 240V SCR volatge regulator, the regulator output volatge is given to KBPC3510 - bridge rectifier (output - 15A ; Peak inverse volatge - 1000 v ; DC output volatge - No idea ), the bridge rectifier output volatge is given to 2 HP PMDC motor (Rated volatage - 180 V & Rated current - 8.2 amp).

When i run the motor, the elcetrical system in my home starts dimming - i think DC voltage may cause this issue.

Or anything i'm doing wrong
 

Thread Starter

Kamesh P

Joined Dec 24, 2017
10
10A is the maximum average current that the rectifier can safely carry.

All a rectifier does is conduct current in one direction (with a forward drop of around 0.7V for a silicon junction diode) and block the current in the other direction.
It has no other effect on the voltage or current.
The current is determined by the load added to the rectifier output.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
As you trying to say my DC output voltage and current, based on my 2 HP pmdc motor load.... Is it ????
 

Thread Starter

Kamesh P

Joined Dec 24, 2017
10
The whole house is wired on one 15a circuit!:p
Post Motor Circuit.
Max.
(moved from double post).
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I have single phase 240v, 60Hz input AC supply, that input supply is regulated by 10000W 240V SCR volatge regulator ( It is used to control volatge, so i can control motor speed - it is my moto) , the regulator output volatge is given to KBPC3510 - bridge rectifier (output - 35A ; Peak inverse volatge - 1000 v ; avg DC output volatge from rectifier - No idea ), the bridge rectifier output volatge is given to 2 HP PMDC motor (Rated volatage - 180 V & Rated current - 8.2 amp).

When i start my i rotate freely for 1 minutes, then it starts sucking large volatge from house, then all electrical system in my starts dimming, but no problem with motor it will motor but sudden jerk will be there when this happening.

Can you help me to finish this project.

I dont know why this happening. Guide run motor without this volatge drop on my house
 

Attachments

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
10,915
My guess would be that the voltage 'regulator' is not adequately rated for controlling the 2HP motor and is breaking down, causing excessive current draw. But your house wiring and its protective system (fuses, circuit-breakers) is also in question if a 2HP load causes dimming.
 

Thread Starter

Kamesh P

Joined Dec 24, 2017
10
My guess would be that the voltage 'regulator' is not adequately rated for controlling the 2HP motor and is breaking down, causing excessive current draw. But your house wiring and its protective system (fuses, circuit-breakers) is also in question if a 2HP load causes dimming.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Voltage regulator is rated for 4000w , i.e 15A regulator
But my pmdc motor rated current is 8.2 A only.
 
Top