Shocking myself...

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
30,290
Seems most of its radiation is Alpha - which was the type suggested.

There's a clue in the name - "ionisation chamber".
Yep -- it's a strong alpha emitter (which is what you want for what it does) and doesn't emit a lot of other stuff (though some, of course).

I used them as a proxy for radon decay because the Am-241 alpha particle energy is about 10% less than that of radon, which meant that if I could detect Am-241 at the edge of my physical shield that I could detect radon out to that distance as well.

Plus, it was easy to get them and I didn't have to jump through the accountability hoops that I did for registered sources such as Po-210, even though they are about 80 times as active as the one polonium source I had. Furthermore, with a half-life of about 432 years, I didn't have to worry about them going bad.

There were older ionization detectors that used Am-241 sources at about 80 microcurie.
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,536
The nice thing about Alpha particles is that they rarely penetrate a sheet of paper, let along your skin. It may be the tamest ionization radiation source available.
A smoke alarm probably wouldn't help much with static charge unless you did a bit of dismantling then.

There were at one time mildly radioactive sources on the market for ESD handling.
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,536
An old solution is to touch things with a key. The energy transfer is the same, but the key acts as a contact surface area multiplier.

You can buy certified ($$$) anti-static coating in a bottle; you wipe it on the work surface with a rag. Diluted Downy works just as well (people actually tested this in the 70's). There still has to be a contact point for a wire or path to earth ground, but that is a constant in all surface management.

ak
Any spray cleaner with ammonia leaks charges away, but isn't permanent - polishes with silicone make it worse.
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,536
My first 40 hour job was on 27KV TV's but those chronic static shocks are irritating to the point that you become angry with yourself every time you forget to ground out the charge properly.:mad: It's just a darn nuisance, and it comes and goes with the weather, so you have to keep changing your habits from day to day.

It was easier in Southern California where static is a constant. You develop behavior patterns and they work consistently.
The inner and outer conductive coating on a CRT flare forms the EHT reservoir capacitor.

Apparently the glass polarizes in some way or other so that the charge recovers after you've shorted it - the times that bit me weren't exactly rare.
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
12,396
The inner and outer conductive coating on a CRT flare forms the EHT reservoir capacitor.

Apparently the glass polarizes in some way or other so that the charge recovers after you've shorted it - the times that bit me weren't exactly rare.
Many ordinary capacitor dielectrics do this too. Beware high voltage caps.
 
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