Satellite LoRa range

sagor

Joined Mar 10, 2019
894
Answer depends if the satellite has a highly directional antenna or not. If directional, it points to the earth at approximately right angles to the earth surface. Thus, at the extremes of your red area, the antenna would be pointing somewhat away from you, making signals very weak.
Satellites can be placed tens of thousands of miles away from earth. Geostationary satellites are about 22,300 miles away (almost 36,000km). Others like the James Webb telescope is even farther away (1.5 million km). Not sure if that still counts as a "satellite" in general terms however, it is more like a "space object". The Webb telescope actually orbits the sun just like earth does, so it could be considered a satellite of the sun, not an earth satellite
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

Solanum Asteridion

Joined Sep 5, 2023
36
Answer depends if the satellite has a highly directional antenna or not. If directional, it points to the earth at approximately right angles to the earth surface. Thus, at the extremes of your red area, the antenna would be pointing somewhat away from you, making signals very weak.
Satellites can be placed tens of thousands of miles away from earth. Geostationary satellites are about 22,300 miles away (almost 36,000km). Others like the James Webb telescope is even farther away (1.5 million km). Not sure if that still counts as a "satellite" in general terms however, it is more like a "space object". The Webb telescope actually orbits the sun just like earth does, so it could be considered a satellite of the sun, not an earth satellite
No It is not a directional antenna....
 

sagor

Joined Mar 10, 2019
894
OK, assume the antenna is omni-directional. Then yes, you should be able to communicate within the red boundary. However, at the extreme edges of that red area, the signal losses (path losses) will be greater, due to being farther away from you than directly overhead. The lower the satellite, the bigger the difference in distance would be. The higher the satellite, the difference would be a smaller percentage of orbit height. Think of the moon, distance from any place on earth may be only a few thousand miles different compare to total distance of over 239,000 miles.
Another factor is the radio path through the earth's atmosphere may be 2 or 3 times longer at the red edges than overhead, producing even more attenuation of radio signals, depending on frequencies used.
 
Top