Riden RD6018 Power Supply - Choosing the right AC to DC PSU

Thread Starter

Lumenosity

Joined Mar 1, 2017
521
Got tired of the dirt cheap power supplies and bought a just above dirt cheap Riden RD6018W

I'm confused about it. It's touted as an 18Amp unit, yet when I contacted the manufacturer, they said that is only at 220v.

I told them I was in the USA and we (normally?) use 110-120v AC so I asked what was the maximum Amps I could get from that unit with 120v and what power supply would I need to get that? Can I "safely" use a 65v, 40Amp AC-DC PSU with it ?

They never answered that question, so I wondered if anyone here knew?
(Note: The answer could be right n the specs and I still would not realize it)
Thanks


Specifications:
Name: Voltmeter
Model: RD6018, RD6018-W (optional)
Material: ABS
Input voltage: 6-70.00V
Output voltage: 0-60.00V
Output current: 0-18.00A
Output power: 0-1080W
Input voltage measurement resolution: 0.01V
Output voltage setting measurement resolution: 0.01V
Output current setting measurement resolution: 0.01A
Battery voltage measurement resolution: 0.01V
Input voltage measurement accuracy: ±(1%+5 digits)
Output voltage accuracy between setting and measurement: ±(0.3%+3 digits)
Output current accuracy between setting and measurement: ±(0.5%+5 digits)
Battery voltage measurement accuracy: ±(0.5%+3 digits)
Automatic cut off current value when chargings: 100mA
Output ripple typical: 250mV VPP@6A
Working temperature: -10℃ to 40℃
External sensor temperature detection: -10℃ to 100℃/0℉ to 200℉
External sensor temperature detection accuracy: ±3℃/±6℉ Constant voltage mode response time: 2ms(0.1A-5A Load)
Constant voltage mode load regulation: ±(0.1%+2 digits)
Constant current mode load regulation: ±(0.1%+3 digits)
Capacity measurement: 0-9999.99Ah
Energy measurement: 0-9999.99Wh
Capacity and energy statistical error: ±2%
Buck working mode: Voltage drop >1V and >10%
Cooling fan start-condition: Output current>8A or System temperature>45℃
Cooling fan shut down condition when working: Output current <7.9A and System temperature <45℃
Over temperature protections: System temperature >80℃
Screen brightness setting: 0-5(6 level in total)
Screen: 2.4 inch color display
Item size: 167 * 81 * 69mm / 6.57 * 3.19 * 2.72in
Package size: 250 * 150 * 100mm / 9.84 * 5.91 * 3.94in
Package weight: 680g / 1.50lb
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,190
I am very confused. The device is a buck converter with metering, not a power supply. It requires a DC input from 6-60 or 70V depending on which list of specs you believe. The The maximum output current is listed as 18A but the maximum power is 1080W.

Power is a product of voltage and current so the device will provide different power (W) at different voltages (V) and currents (A) with rated maximums for each of 18A and 60V (or the input voltage minus some dropout whichever is lower).

W=VA (Power = Voltage * Current) This means if the input from your DC power supply is 70V (according to this set of specs) it can produce a maximum of 60V, and 60V at 18A is 1080W but if you set it to 10V then you will only get 180W.

Again, this is just a buck converter. It can give you up to almost the input voltage from the power supply, or less, up to 1080W at maximum voltage and current.
 

Thread Starter

Lumenosity

Joined Mar 1, 2017
521
I am very confused. The device is a buck converter with metering, not a power supply. It requires a DC input from 6-60 or 70V depending on which list of specs you believe. The The maximum output current is listed as 18A but the maximum power is 1080W.

Power is a product of voltage and current so the device will provide different power (W) at different voltages (V) and currents (A) with rated maximums for each of 18A and 60V (or the input voltage minus some dropout whichever is lower).

W=VA (Power = Voltage * Current) This means if the input from your DC power supply is 70V (according to this set of specs) it can produce a maximum of 60V, and 60V at 18A is 1080W but if you set it to 10V then you will only get 180W.

Again, this is just a buck converter. It can give you up to almost the input voltage from the power supply, or less, up to 1080W at maximum voltage and current.
I wonder why the manufacturer tells me I will never get 18Amps from this unit at 110v ? They say only 9Amps if using 110v AC ?

So you're saying if I have a 60v 1080Watt AC to DC power supply, running off of 110v AC, powering the buck converter (Riden RD6018), then the buck converter will supply the full 18Amps ? (assuming it is rated for 18Amps)

Am I understanding you correctly ?
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,190
I wonder why the manufacturer tells me I will never get 18Amps from this unit at 110v ? They say only 9Amps if using 110v AC ?

So you're saying if I have a 60v 1080Watt AC to DC power supply, running off of 110v AC, powering the buck converter (Riden RD6018), then the buck converter will supply the full 18Amps ? (assuming it is rated for 18Amps)

Am I understanding you correctly ?
The input voltage to the PS powering the buck converter is immaterial. If you can provide (a bit more than) 18A, the converter will provide it.

Remember, the converter is not 100% efficient so there will be loses. To get 1080W out you will have to put something more than 1080W in.
 

Thread Starter

Lumenosity

Joined Mar 1, 2017
521
The input voltage to the PS powering the buck converter is immaterial. If you can provide (a bit more than) 18A, the converter will provide it.

Remember, the converter is not 100% efficient so there will be loses. To get 1080W out you will have to put something more than 1080W in.
What if my AC to DC power supply is 60v but 40amps ?

Will that harm the Riden buck converter?

I'm not an electronics scholar.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,190
What if my AC to DC power supply is 60v but 40amps ?

Will that harm the Riden buck converter?

I'm not an electronics scholar.
The power supply decides the voltage and the load decides the current. Your PS will be limited by its maximum output but the load, in this case the buck converter, will determine how much of the total current if can produce will be drawn.

An over voltage power supply can do damage, there is no such thing as an over current supply, though some offer Constant Current mode (benchtop supplies) because current limiting while messing around on the bench is a Good Thing®.
 

Thread Starter

Lumenosity

Joined Mar 1, 2017
521
The power supply decides the voltage and the load decides the current. Your PS will be limited by its maximum output but the load, in this case the buck converter, will determine how much of the total current if can produce will be drawn.

An over voltage power supply can do damage, there is no such thing as an over current supply, though some offer Constant Current mode (benchtop supplies) because current limiting while messing around on the bench is a Good Thing®.

Since the RD6018 is rated for 70v and 18A, I take that to mean I can use a 65v, 40Amp power supply.
Thanks much !
 

Thread Starter

Lumenosity

Joined Mar 1, 2017
521
From Riden Website......

800W PSU can let RD6018 output 18A, but it cannot let RD6018 full output because it is lower than the max output power of RD6018(1080W)

1000W PSU is 68V 17A output at 220V AC input, it can let RD6018 full output, but it is 68V 14.7A (about 1000W) at 110V AC input, so it cannot let RD6018 full output, please set the power limit to 950W in RD6018 setting.


Riden_S800_powerSupply_1.jpg
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

Lumenosity

Joined Mar 1, 2017
521
Thanks Anniel747

The problems was that RDTech (supposedly an authority on them)....kept insisting that I could not get 18A out of the RD6018 at 120v. Only at 220v.

I had a discussion with him/her on another forum. I'm not sure if something was lost in translation or if he/she was in another country and just did not do the math correctly or what.

However, One of my Riden RD6018's has an 800watt, 65v PSU in it and I can confirm that I can push 18Amps from it on 120v AC, even though it's rated at 13.5A

Again, it's just math right?
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
1,497
Sorry to jump in,

I'm confused,
could you draw a picture of what you have connected to what please,

the unit yo post the spec for , and asked abotu mains input is specified as

Input voltage: 6-70.00V
 
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