Resistor's Insulation Voltage

Thread Starter

Doros

Joined Dec 17, 2013
137
Hello everybody and happy New Year,

For high voltage resistors, I was puzzled with a technical parameter called "Insulation Voltage" or (maybe is the same thing)
"Dielectric Withstanding Voltage". If I have understood well is the max. voltage applied between the resistor's leads and its body.

Having a HV resistor, withstanding 3KV between it's leads, in which circumstances the "insulation voltage" can be taken into consideration?

Will be any case that a voltage can be applied between the leads and the body of the resistor?

Am I missing something important for my circuits?

Thank you very much, and the best for the New Year
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
12,248
No two parts (including any body part) of the resistor should have more than the specified maximum voltage applied between them.
 

Thread Starter

Doros

Joined Dec 17, 2013
137
Thanks Alec_t for the reply,

I have attached VISHAYs VR68 specification sheet, and as you can see i.e. for VR68 resistor's series, they have operating voltage 10KV, and Insulation Voltge 700V. That's why I am puzzled with this parameter
 

Attachments

Thread Starter

Doros

Joined Dec 17, 2013
137
Thanks dl324,

but where it is important in our circuits? We apply voltage at the leads of a resistor, never at one lead and the body.

Or let's assume the voltage applied at a resitor is 1KV, and the resistor is almost touching the grounded chassis of an electrical appliance. That could be a problem?
 
Or let's assume the voltage applied at a resitor is 1KV, and the resistor is almost touching the grounded chassis of an electrical appliance. That could be a problem?
Exactly. You might have to employ standoffs or Teflon posts to meet the insulation requirements of your application.
 

Thread Starter

Doros

Joined Dec 17, 2013
137
Many thanks KeepItSimple, that make sense,

And of course Happy New Year to everybody in this helpful place (forum)
(sorry for the wrong placement of my question)
 
Top