Regulator Rectifier Charging Multiple Batteries

Thread Starter

Csecrist12

Joined Nov 1, 2019
15
As I am really new to circuits and electrical components and by no means any expert in any field, I do have basic understanding and knowledge of must stuff I have researched and gone through.

So for some background, I am in the process of building an electric bike with a transmission. My platform is a 1981 Honda cm400T that I picked up for dirt cheap. I am only in the testing phase and just want to see if it would be possible at all.

I basically took out the pistons and some other components of the main combustion system to see how easily it was to rotate the crank by hand. Surprisingly, it was easier than expected. My idea is to have the timing chain that was connected to the cam would be hooked up to an electric motor with a sprocket. The timing chain is connected to the crank in the lower end that is connected to the transmission and so on.

So my idea is if I could have the stator charge the batteries by the rotation of the electric motor. I'm not wanting it to be topped off like a normal combustion motor, but to at least slow down the draining throughout the use of the bike. I am wanting a 48v system to be charged by the stator, rectifier regulator, but from my understanding, it only regulates it at 14.5v on a normal gas bike.

I did testing last night with my set up and I did have 28v AC coming from the stator before the rectifier was plugged in at a lower battery output into a small electric razor motor I had laying around. So i am getting something from the rotation of such as expected. I have a video I can put up as well with my rough testing set up.

Is there any way to split the ac wires from the stator into multiple regulators and do it that way? I understand if you split it into parallel circuits, you lose the voltage and the stator can only output so much ac voltage from the rotation of the motor. Do they make a 48v regulator rectifier for this type of stator? Could I have a different stator to allow for a more ac voltage to be able to split it up into multiple regulators? I also understand the complexity of the perpetual motion and yada yada stuff. I am a mechanic engineer that is also wanting to dab into electrical stuff since that's what the world is going to.

Regardless if the charging system wouldn't work, I'm still going to make an e-bike with a transmission as that's the next step for electric cars.
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
12,149
Welcome to AAC!
If I understand you correctly you want to make an e-bike powered by a battery, but drive an auxiliary electric motor mechanically as a generator to feed energy back to the battery? If so, the mechanical energy would have to come from the battery, so there would be no energy saving or battery life extension. On the contrary there would be a net energy loss because of conversion inefficiencies.
 

Thread Starter

Csecrist12

Joined Nov 1, 2019
15
In a sense, yes. Basically the electric dc motor would be replacing the work that the pistons did from the combustion. The dc motor would contribute the rotation force driving everything. The dc motor would be supplied by the batteries that is being charged form the rotation of the motor. This wouldn't prolong the discharge of the batteries while the bike is moving? Again, I'm completely new to this world of electrical components.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
3,484
What you ate describing is a perpetual motion machine.

A battery driving a motor driving a generator cannot charge the battery. All you are doing is wasting energy through multiple coversions.

Bob
 

Thread Starter

Csecrist12

Joined Nov 1, 2019
15
That's what I considered and wasn't expecting to make it last forever. My main intentions would be to while it was moving down the road, it would sustain what it had in the batteries. Obviously starting of the motion would be a loss of energy and that's what would drain the batteries more over than the actual motion of driving, in a sense. Would it be possible to lower the inefficiencies as low as they can go to get that longer lasting goal?
 

Thread Starter

Csecrist12

Joined Nov 1, 2019
15
Could there be a way to drain one set of batteries (24V) while the other 2 batteries (24V) are being charged and have a relay switch the charging system to the set that has drained? Again, it's not having a forever lasting motor, just to bring the range from the batteries a lot further than what is out there?
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
3,484
You cannot get more energy out of a battery by taking some of the energy out, losing some to heat, and putting the rest back in losing some more to heat. The battery will last longest when you disconnect your motor generator from it.

Bob
 
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