Pulse Sequence Generation

Thread Starter

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
3,507
Fooling around with mBlock, here is a sequence of pulses easily coded (gui Scratch
like language, mBlock, drag and drop and configure, code then auto generated based
on blocks used and variable settings).

Reliably create fairly accurate pulses down to 1 mS, into years as well, and sequences,
repeating sequences, pulses depending on a V reading and/or triggers like external trigger.

upload_2019-6-30_21-35-32.png


Here is mBlock IDE, code automatically generated, shown in right hand window. Running on Arduino
UNO. I think I can squeeze this into an ATTINY as well.

Very complex sequences trivial to create, accurate (Arduino has xtal on board).
Note embedded triggers can be put in, like a voltage in a range or exceeding a
value. Or that AND a counter overflow, whatever. mBlock is free, Arduino UNO
or NANO < $ 5, easy to get started.

If instead of mBlock you use Snap4Arduino you can display interrogated Arduino
stuff like V measured or PWM / counter values on PC w/o having to write Python
for example.

upload_2019-6-30_21-39-16.png


Regards, Dana.
 

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Thread Starter

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
3,507
No question, just informative post what can be done w/o coding, and
ease and flexibility with todays tools/Arduino.

Google "mblock getting started video", several on web.


Regards, Dana.
 
Last edited:

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
7,697
I can't see the 2nd attachment clearly enough to read it, but there seems to be code off to the right. What do you mean by, "without coding?"
 

Thread Starter

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
3,507
The coding is generated by the tool from the gui drag and drop
interface user does in the middle window. So if you are not a
C programmer you can still get an idea of what C code looks
like and its relationship to the visual aspect of the tool for the
user.


Regards, Dana.
 

Thread Starter

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
3,507
Flowcode presents a flow diagram interface, whereas mBlock the block
approach, like MIT Scratch. Both generate code. Both have strengths/
weakneses.


Regards, Dana.
 
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