Problem : Passing cable through Metal/Nylon Cable Gland with connector head at either other end

Thread Starter

2Pringles

Joined Apr 9, 2022
38
Hello Guys

I am trying to use a Metal Cable Gland to grip tight the cable coming out of my enclosure.

The cable itself passes through fine, however as there is an aerial connector head at either end of the cable, I cannot pass it through the Cable Gland.

I could buy a bigger Cable Gland so that the Aerial connector passes through it, but then the cable gland itself doesnt grip the cable as the rubber seal is too small...

I have attached a picture to demonstrate the issue.

Cable Gland.png


Are there any other componenets to address this issue?

It doesnt seem correct to cut the cable and then reconnect... because if I had to take the cable out, I would have to cut it again and so on....
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
28,768
Use the larger cable gland and use either electrical tape or rubber seal gland tape, to reduce the hole, There is also RTV as a sealant if needed.
If you need the stain relief characteristic, use telephone clip to anchor the cord close to the bushing.
 

Thread Starter

2Pringles

Joined Apr 9, 2022
38
Use the larger cable gland and use either electrical tape or rubber seal gland tape, to reduce the hole, There is also RTV as a sealant if needed.
If you need the stain relief characteristic, use telephone clip to anchor the cord close to the bushing.
Thanks, perhaps better still I could take the smaller seal from my original Cable Gland and place it inside the seal of the larger Cable Gland to sandwich both.
 

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
1,658
Hello Guys

I am trying to use a Metal Cable Gland to grip tight the cable coming out of my enclosure.

The cable itself passes through fine, however as there is an aerial connector head at either end of the cable, I cannot pass it through the Cable Gland.

I could buy a bigger Cable Gland so that the Aerial connector passes through it, but then the cable gland itself doesnt grip the cable as the rubber seal is too small...

I have attached a picture to demonstrate the issue.

View attachment 268932


Are there any other componenets to address this issue?

It doesnt seem correct to cut the cable and then reconnect... because if I had to take the cable out, I would have to cut it again and so on....
Is that a male DIN plug on that cable? If so I would not hesitate to remove the connector and solder a fresh one on, soldering DIN plugs is easy if you've soldered much, absolutely the way to do this. How many cores does the cable have?
 
Last edited:

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,986
I have used, on several occasions, cable seals that function similar to what SB described, except that they are made to be used that way and there is no cutting required. There are also what are called "bulkhead feed-thru connectors" that provide the mating connector on each side so that cables can be plugged in on each side of the panel.

And a caution note that some connectors are molded onto the cable ends after installation and are not able to be re-installed. It is not clear from the picture just what sort of cable and connector you have.
 

Thread Starter

2Pringles

Joined Apr 9, 2022
38
@2Pringles If you have one that fits the cable already slice it longways on one side. Put the cable in and a small dot of super glue on the slice.
Thanks, will keep in mind.


Is that a male DIN plug on that cable? If so I would not hesitate to remove the connector and solder a fresh one on, soldering DIN plugs is easy if you've soldered much, absolutely the way to do this. How many cores does the cable have?
The problem with this approach is that should i need to remove the cable, I then have to cut it again and so on.
Its a tedious process that im sure there is a better way around.


I have used, on several occasions, cable seals that function similar to what SB described, except that they are made to be used that way and there is no cutting required. There are also what are called "bulkhead feed-thru connectors" that provide the mating connector on each side so that cables can be plugged in on each side of the panel.

And a caution note that some connectors are molded onto the cable ends after installation and are not able to be re-installed. It is not clear from the picture just what sort of cable and connector you have.
Thanks, this is more what I am looking for, do you know of any other "connector" names?
 

Sensacell

Joined Jun 19, 2012
3,475
Just hack the cable in the middle.
So much easier to do a pretty, clean splice in the middle of a cable and your chances of messing up the pin order are vastly lower.

A gland big enough to pass a the connector will never seal on the small wire.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,986
If you need to remove the cable, just remove the retaining nut and then remove the whole assembly. Hole plugs are common and cheap. Then to re-install the cable, just remove the hole plug and re-install the cable.
In reality, even an expert-made splice is a poor choice if there is an alternative. Worse, if it is a shielded cable or perhaps a USB cable, or worse yet, an HDMI video cable, spicing will assure that it does not work again, ever.
But for the connector in the picture, it should work to take it apart and slice the metal portion lengthwise. Not the compression nut or the retainer nut, though. One clean cut on all the rubber parts and you can pass the cable through the holes and then assemble the feed thru around the cable. No longer waterproof, but still splash proof. Fairly simple and fairly cheap. You will need a fine-toothed hacksaw blade though.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,948
One solution is to install a bulkhead connector.
Another solution is to cut the cable and install mating male & female mating inline connectors on the inside of the box.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
9,236
One solution is to install a bulkhead connector.
Another solution is to cut the cable and install mating male & female mating inline connectors on the inside of the box.
A column product in the AV industry is a cable with large connectors (e.g.: DB15) having an inline connector on one end so it can be pulled through conduit. Whether this approach is practical depends to a great extent on what signals are on the cable, but given DIN I doubt the voltage, current, or frequnencumbered is any real issue.

In fact, it might be possible to use mini DIN as the smaller connector for passthrough.

1654848803630.png
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,986
At some point the installation of another connector pair becomes dependent on soldering skills and equipment.Especially the mini-din connectors and the smaller ones, demand much more capability than most folks posses.
So I suggest going with splitting the feed-thru as i suggested before. And removing the whole assembly when the connection is not required.
Just consider trying to install a connector in one of the 19 conductor HDMI cables. Or even a USB-3 cable.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,986
Posts #4 and #8 suggest using a feed thru made in a split manner. My suggestion was to manually split the steel outer shell as well as slicing the rubber insert. That is a bit different. Similar concept, but not the same.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
28,768
Per #2, It is very simple to do what I have done in the past using a bushing as shown in the OP, T&B make bushings that are made to take 0.19" to .25" cable , slit the bushing and reseal with RTV, If wishing to remove later on, just a simple matter of opening the RTV joint.
The bushing shell takes much larger dia that the DIN connector.
Maybe the OP is unaware that a bushing can be purchased for many cable diameters
 
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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,986
And also unaware that the whole assembly can be taken out of the panel and replaced with a plug. Bot if it is a larger connector than what we saw, such as for a computer monitor, then the hole would need to be bigger and use an adapter with a larger nut. easy to do if one has a hole saw,
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
10,049
Posts #4 and #8 suggest using a feed thru made in a split manner. My suggestion was to manually split the steel outer shell as well as slicing the rubber insert. That is a bit different. Similar concept, but not the same.
Post #8 isn't even something you said. And splitting a fitting like that is something I can tell you've never done, getting the nut back on is not easy when it expands and distorts.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
28,768
And also unaware that the whole assembly can be taken out of the panel and replaced with a plug. Bot if it is a larger connector than what we saw, such as for a computer monitor, then the hole would need to be bigger and use an adapter with a larger nut. easy to do if one has a hole saw,
The impression I got from the OP is that standard DIN connectors are being used?
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,986
Post #8 isn't even something you said. And splitting a fitting like that is something I can tell you've never done, getting the nut back on is not easy when it expands and distorts.
Yes, SB, I have done it several times. And it did take a small bit of work with a fine file, but it certainly is able to be done.
 
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