Privacy lost...

marcuskeene

Joined Oct 15, 2018
27
I would say with the way people are using social media, we have not just lost privacy, we are actually redefining slavery... Take a look at what parents are doing with their children on line in order to gain "followers" and become "influencers" (just recently learned that word). This is the freedom our ancestors fought for...
Haha. Why blame those who are gone? Lol

They never asked us to be addicted to technology. We must be wise and responsible when using it. That's it.
Similarly with innovating tech, if we are not responsible while developing it, we are doomed for sure. But if we set the guidelines and abide by them religiously, it can benefit us in ways we never imagined.
 

justtrying

Joined Mar 9, 2011
428
Haha. Why blame those who are gone? Lol

They never asked us to be addicted to technology. We must be wise and responsible when using it. That's it.
Similarly with innovating tech, if we are not responsible while developing it, we are doomed for sure. But if we set the guidelines and abide by them religiously, it can benefit us in ways we never imagined.
Actually, technology currently is being wisely and responsibly used by the likes of Facebook, Google, and Amazon to put money in their pockets. How are they unwise and irresponsible in their use from their standpoint? These companies are making huge profits off of data mining. Their are making their users work for them free of charge. What is unwise and irresponsible about that from a market standpoint? Especially since the users fully support this system?

Abiding religiously by guidelines sounds like an interesting concept as well... A new age tech orthodoxy of sorts, with ten commandements rewritten...

BTW until problems with reliable power are solved, the whole idea is really a non starter. An avalanche comes down and you cannot buy groceries. But of course I live in a pretty isolated area. This is why people need to move to large city centers. And there are many distopias written about how that could go.
 
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marcuskeene

Joined Oct 15, 2018
27
Actually, technology currently is being wisely and responsibly used by the likes of Facebook, Google, and Amazon to put money in their pockets. How are they unwise and irresponsible in their use from their standpoint? These companies are making huge profits off of data mining. Their are making their users work for them free of charge. What is unwise and irresponsible about that from a market standpoint? Especially since the users fully support this system?
Then we must not crib. That's it. My answer was originally to point out how we put everything on the tech. Good or bad, we are the ones driving it. So, whether the companies are robbing users off of everything or whether we support them in doing so, we must share the blame.

Abiding religiously by guidelines sounds like an interesting concept as well... A new age tech orthodoxy of sorts, with ten commandements rewritten...
Well, atleast it gives you a direction, everybody may keep arguing rules are meant to be broken, but we agree to follow the forum guidelines religiously(and pretty much do that too)? Its not as difficult as it sounds, but we are designed to willingly go against something that falls into a straight line.
 

justtrying

Joined Mar 9, 2011
428
Then we must not crib. That's it. My answer was originally to point out how we put everything on the tech. Good or bad, we are the ones driving it. So, whether the companies are robbing users off of everything or whether we support them in doing so, we must share the blame.


Well, atleast it gives you a direction, everybody may keep arguing rules are meant to be broken, but we agree to follow the forum guidelines religiously(and pretty much do that too)? Its not as difficult as it sounds, but we are designed to willingly go against something that falls into a straight line.
Following forum rules might not be a good example. Forum does not affect your daily life and if you disagree, you simply leave.

There is much that I disagree with in terms of what is happening with technology today. Most let it happen passively until it is too late.

Perhaps to make for a better discussion one should separate consumer techology from technology which actually is capable of helping us, such as robotic limbs for example. The wonders of a cellphone that everyone has is used for one thing only - social media. People dont even talk to each other anymore. That is not helping us as individuals or as a society.

You can almost always blame the individual. Everything is a choice.

But how much choice do we have left? I already posted on monopolies.
 

marcuskeene

Joined Oct 15, 2018
27
There is much that I disagree with in terms of what is happening with technology today. Most let it happen passively until it is too late.
I agree on this. A lot of stuff being discussed is pointless but we have somehow started questioning everything that technology promises or if t seems a bit disruptive. Mobile phones like you mentioned, have been the biggest disruption but we still accepted it.

You can almost always blame the individual. Everything is a choice.
But how much choice do we have left? I already posted on monopolies.
I bet there are still people out there who aren't addicted to social media. Its not that they are unaware but they choose to invest their time qualitatively. Now it certainly doesn't mean they don't use it at all. So who's stops the rest to follow?

Similarly, I understand there could be apprehensions and people can argue over technology taking us out of the picture. But I don't think its practically possible. No matter how much you blame the big shots, they need consumers to run their businesses and consumers needs buying capacity to do that. If technology robs them off their jobs, who is going to buy the stuff they create? Robots?
 

RacerFlash

Joined Nov 2, 2018
0
It’s not just facial recognition now. They say with the progress of AI comes our loss of privacy in general. They say AI will have the ability to collect huge amounts of data without consent, and put humans under surveillance can be a threat to privacy. What are your thoughts about this?
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610
This affects all of the "Five Eyes" countries as Australian network portals become the legal bypass for local protections.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UKUSA_Agreement

https://sg.news.yahoo.com/australia-passes-cyber-snooping-laws-global-implications-103222310.html
Meanwhile, the Australian legislation could allow for policy laundering by its "Five Eyes" intelligence-sharing partners -- Canada, Britain, New Zealand, and the United States -- who cannot enact similar powers because of constitutional or human rights protections.

"There is an extraterritorial dimension to it, where for example the US would be able to make... a request directly to Australia to get information from Facebook or a tech company," said Queensland University of Technology's technology regulation researcher Monique Mann.
We do it for other members: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/us-spy-base-taps-uk-phones-for-mi5-1364399.html
Under US law, the phone-tapping of foreign nationals in a foreign country does not require any licence. Even though it is on British soil, Menwith Hill is US-owned and regarded by the US government as under its jursidiction.

Liberty said it had been concerned for some time that "a US base is spying on British citizens and that spying is unregulated by British law".
 
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nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610
Time passes, but the topic becomes only relevant. After creating Facebook, everyone knows everything about everyone. It makes no sense to install special cameras because everyone has a smartphone with them that shows where you are.
Not everyone is on social media and some of us old farts don't carry smartphones or even dumb ones every second of our lonely lives.

 

Fayryar

Joined Jun 8, 2018
2
A question of anonymity is pretty important nowadays and the example of the topic starter is quite terrifying. I don't understand why people don't do something against it. At least on the Internet, we can be secured with different proxies. We can even protect our smartphones using the . And so on. Hope, such things won't be employed for bad purposes.

MOD: Links Deleted.E
 
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They are doing a lot worse than that. Those towers on either side of the bridge that people are calling 5g towers are not. Or, maybe they are also. But the primary purpose is something else. I don't want to say what because I don't like getting flamed but you don't need two cellphone towers on opposite sides of a street. I'll tell you this. Notice the physical design of the towers is reminiscent of amazon's echo. It is not an accident. Its a concrete problem.
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,837
They are doing a lot worse than that. Those towers on either side of the bridge that people are calling 5g towers are not. Or, maybe they are also. But the primary purpose is something else. I don't want to say what because I don't like getting flamed but you don't need two cellphone towers on opposite sides of a street. I'll tell you this. Notice the physical design of the towers is reminiscent of amazon's echo. It is not an accident. Its a concrete problem.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610
https://theintercept.com/2019/01/10/amazon-ring-security-camera/
At the same time, the source said, Ring unnecessarily provided executives and engineers in the U.S. with highly privileged access to the company’s technical support video portal, allowing unfiltered, round-the-clock live feeds from some customer cameras, regardless of whether they needed access to this extremely sensitive data to do their jobs. For someone who’d been given this top-level access — comparable to Uber’s infamous “God mode” map that revealed the movements of all passengers — only a Ring customer’s email address was required to watch cameras from that person’s home. Although the source said they never personally witnessed any egregious abuses, they told The Intercept “if [someone] knew a reporter or competitor’s email address, [they] could view all their cameras.” The source also recounted instances of Ring engineers “teasing each other about who they brought home” after romantic dates. Although the engineers in question were aware that they were being surveilled by their co-workers in real time, the source questioned whether their companions were similarly informed.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610
At the time the Ukrainian access was provided, the video files were left unencrypted, the source said, because of Ring leadership’s “sense that encryption would make the company less valuable,” owing to the expense of implementing encryption and lost revenue opportunities due to restricted access.
"If it costs an extra nickle..."


What's in your bedroom?
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2019/03/massive-database-leak-gives-us-window-chinas-digital-surveillance-state
Although relatively little news gets out of Xinjiang to the rest of the world, we’ve known for over a year that China has been testing facial-recognition tracking and alert systems across Xinjiang and mandating the collection of biometric data—including DNA samples, voice samples, fingerprints, and iris scans—from all residents between the ages of 12 and 65. Reports from the province in 2016 indicated that Xinjiang residents can be questioned over the use of mobile and Internet tools; just having WhatsApp or Skype installed on your phone is classified as “subversive behavior.” Since 2017, the authorities have instructed all Xinjiang mobile phone users to install a spyware app in order to “prevent [them] from accessing terrorist information.”
 
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