PicKit3 not connecting to dsPIC33EP128GP502

Thread Starter

ABC DEF

Joined Sep 30, 2017
4
I apologize in advance if this question is beyond the scope of this forum based on its relative level of simplicity, but I am eager to get started on a /long/ quest to make a machine. However, as I expected, the connecting of the PicKit3 to the device is and probably will be my only main obstacle.

I keep getting an error on the MPLAB X IPE output when trying to connect:

-----------------------------------------
Connecting to MPLAB PICkit 3...

Currently loaded firmware on PICkit 3
Firmware Suite Version.....01.50.04
Firmware type..............dsPIC33E/24E

Programmer to target power is enabled - VDD = 3.250000 volts.
Target Device ID (0x0) is an Invalid Device ID. Please check your connections to the Target Device.
-----------------------------------------

I have recreated what I've done here:
https://imgur.com/a/sJjbL
where 104 is a non-polarized ceramic capacitor

Can anyone shed some light on where I am going wrong and how to possibly fix it? I just want to get started already. I've been at this for 2 days already and I'm getting restless.
 
Last edited:

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,898
Are you sure the IPE is set for programming channel 1 (PGECx and PGEDx) on the device? You can also try channel 3 like I have with this PIC24.

 

Thread Starter

ABC DEF

Joined Sep 30, 2017
4
Are you sure the IPE is set for programming channel 1 (PGECx and PGEDx) on the device? You can also try channel 3 like I have with this PIC24.
Yes I've tried connecting to all PGED and PGEC pins. None worked. I'm not sure where in the IPE I would go to see the default PGEDx and PGECx settings.

It's also worth noting that I have purchased 5 of these microcontrollers and all do the same thing. That is, before I have broke all but one of them due to the wide angle of the pins which strangely do not fit in any of my breadboards. (Shouldn't they be making them 90 degrees from the device to fit snugly?)
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

ABC DEF

Joined Sep 30, 2017
4
It's an art we must learn to master I suppose. The question remains: What is causing my issue?

I would very much appreciate a detailed, thorough analysis and correction. Anything helps, though!
 

Picbuster

Joined Dec 2, 2013
990
Check VDD from PICkit if external is selected you still need that pin vdd connected.
now mclr Pic pin running from pic a 1K first then 100nF to gnd from 100nF 5-10K to Vdd.
Pickit3 mclr direct to Pic pin.
This allows the pickit to flipper mclr and eliminate the 100nF effect while loading.

Picbuster
 

OBW0549

Joined Mar 2, 2015
3,203
In addition to a 10 kΩ pullup resistor between MCLR and Vdd, you also need a 10 μF tantalum or ceramic capacitor connected between Vcap (pin 20) and Vss (pin 19). It's unlikely the chip will work without it, as it's needed to stabilize the PIC's internal voltage regulator supplying the CPU core.

Section 2.1, Basic Connection Requirements, in the data sheet should be followed rigorously for this chip to work; it's not very forgiving of poor construction technique.

That is, before I have broke all but one of them due to the wide angle of the pins which strangely do not fit in any of my breadboards. (Shouldn't they be making them 90 degrees from the device to fit snugly?)
No. Integrated circuits are not made to be used in hobby breadboards, they're made to be used in circuit boards assembled in high volume production by automatic pick-and-place machines. When inserting a chip into a board, these machines first compress the chip's leads so they will fit into the holes on the board; then, when they release the chip, the leads spring back outward and grip the sides of the holes, securing the chip in place so it won't fall out before it can be soldered. That is why the leads on ICs (nearly all ICs, not just PIC MCUs) are splayed outward.

To prepare a chip for inserting into a breadboard or an IC socket, hold it horizontally by the ends between thumb and forefinger of each hand with the leads pointing away from you, then bring the chip down onto a flat, hard surface and carefully rotate/press the chip down so as to bend the row of pins into the right orientation. Then flip the chip over and do the other row of pins.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,898
In addition to a 10 kΩ pullup resistor between MCLR and Vdd, you also need a 10 μF tantalum or ceramic capacitor connected between Vcap (pin 20) and Vss (pin 19). It's unlikely the chip will work without it, as it's needed to stabilize the PIC's internal voltage regulator supplying the CPU core.

Section 2.1, Basic Connection Requirements, in the data sheet should be followed rigorously for this chip to work; it's not very forgiving of poor construction technique.
Thanks for the Vcap connection reminder. I have one on my PIC24 images but forgot to say it's necessary.
 
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