Opposing electrical magnets

tom_s

Joined Jun 27, 2014
288
google said:
Electromagnetism is produced when an electrical current flows through a simple conductor such as a piece of wire or cable. A small magnetic field is created around the conductor with the direction of this magnetic field with regards to its “North” and “South” poles being determined by the direction of the current flowing through the conductor.
i would assume the answer is yes, my understanding - reversing the current flow would change the polarity.
 

Alberto

Joined Nov 7, 2008
169
When your coil is powered it will produce a magnetic field with north in front and south on the back ( depending on polarity if DC if AC you will have N and S changing at the AC frequency)

Alberto
 

studiot

Joined Nov 9, 2007
4,998
An electromagnet has north and south poles in just the same way as a permanent magnet.

A linear solenoid generates the same field configuration as a bar magnet.

The direction is given by the right hand screw rule, with the North at the point of the screw as shown in the second part of the sketch on the right.
 

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wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,153
An electromagnet in a black box can not be differentiated from a permanent magnet in a black box. As Ernie noted, a magnet is a magnet.
 

Thread Starter

Gdrumm

Joined Aug 29, 2008
684
What would be the determining factors regarding how much of a gap I could achieve between the magnets, when they are opposing; more voltage, more core wire?

I'm thinking of an application where a machine, when in set up mode, would have two electrical magnets opposing each other, creating a gap (of about 1/8") through which I could thread a substrate.

Then, when switched to the run mode, the magnets would come together, grabbing the substrate, then by mechanical assist, feed the substrate into a die, to be cut.

The unit already exists, and has an electromaget that feeds the material into the die.
The bottom portion is the electrical magnet, the top portion is simply a steel plate.

But I'm looking for a way to thread the material into the magnet area during set up, that does not involve touching the magnet carriage mechanism with human hands.

If I can aviod touching the carriage mechanism during set-up, I can avoid having to lock out the machine, for OSHA concerns.

I've tried a simple spring attached to the top portion, and it does create some seperation, when the magnet is off, but not enough to do what I need to do.

If I increase the spring pressure, then when the unit is turned back on, it is not powerful enough to overcome the spring, and re-engage the substrate.


Thanks,
Gary
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,153
I'm thinking of an application where a machine, when in set up mode, would have two electrical magnets opposing each other, creating a gap (of about 1/8") through which I could thread a substrate.
I don't see why that would not work.

Is it conceivable to replace the steel plate with a permanent magnet? Then all you'd have to do is reverse the current in the existing electromagnet and it would go from attraction to repulsion. A negative, from a safety point of view, is that there would still be attraction with all power off.

Another approach would be to simply replicate the existing electromagnet and replace the steel plate, but you probably don't need as much field strength as this would enable. The 2nd magnet can probably be a much lower field strength.

Field strength is proportional to amp-turns. The usual challenge is to choose which wire gauge to wind so that, in the volume you have to place the coil, you get a reasonable compromise of DC resistance and turns; both go up with wire gauge and length. Of course current - and thus field strength - goes down with DC resistance. Heat dissipation is another concern.
 

studiot

Joined Nov 9, 2007
4,998
To a first approximation you can adapt the formula, which is used to calculate the lifting capacity of lifting electromagnets.


\(P = \frac{{{B^2}A}}{2{\mu}}\)

Where B is the field induced by a single electromagnet by current I.
A is the cross sectional area of the facing steel areas.
P is the force developed between the faces.
 
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Thread Starter

Gdrumm

Joined Aug 29, 2008
684
Replacing the steel plate with a permenant magnet in this case would create a problem. There must be a release between the two during the return stroke, otherwise it would pull the paper (substrate) back out of the die.

I will sleep on it.

It might be best to try to make one, and see how much seperation I get, using parts I have in stock.

It might be a Rube Goldburg too!

Thanks,
Gary
 
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