Need help converting dc led xmas lights to battery operated

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
532
how do i make this battery operated and outdoors? There are 24 lights with 2leds per bubble, it also changes colour and patterns automatic.
There are several ways you can do that. What kind of battery did you have in mind, and how long do you want to run them for?
The simplest way would be to use a 12 volt battery and a car 12V DC to 120V AC converter with the power supply for the lights plugged into it. Any other approach would involve taking the wires off the supply and rewiring them directly to a 12 volt battery. Does the light strip plug into the supply or is it permanently connected?

Keith
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
10,607
Is the light sequencing controlled by the light string itself (probably) or by the adapter (less probably)? It looks as though the cable unscrews/unplugs from the power adapter. If so, the number of connection pins/sockets in the plug would give a clue.
If the lights need 0.5A, as implied by the rating on the adapter, then you will need quite a chunky battery to keep the lights on for hours at a time.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
1,507
Wrap the controller in plastic to be weather-tight and use a 12V battery. Either a car or a smaller lawn tractor/motorcycle 12V battery. Be sure and observe the correct polarity for the control module. If concerned about the bulb fixtures you might try sealing it up with some silicone sealant to make them weather-tight.
 

VernonLS

Joined Oct 9, 2019
42
A car battery would work, but a small motorcycle battery (12V) would also work and be less bulky. Either one will most likely power all the lights for the entire christmas season with no AC connection as the current drain is so small.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,942
Half amp per hour? That's 12 amps in a 24 hour period. Seven days - that's 84 amps used in a week. Two weeks - that's 168 amps. And at that point the battery has gotten rather weak and likely not going to be able to light the lights much longer. If you use a car battery then you don't want CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) you want AMP HOURS. Lots of them. Unless you plan on running the lights off a timer and run them for only four to six hours a night. Now you're starting to get some longevity out of a rather bulky battery.

Where is this going to be put? How is it going to be used?

Forget about using a 12 volt battery to run an inverter to run a 12 volt supply. You'll waste a good percentage of the battery power. And it's not likely the inverter will like being outside in the weather either. Wrapping it in plastic means it will overheat. So forget about that suggestion.
 

Thread Starter

BunkerHill5

Joined Dec 12, 2019
2
There are several ways you can do that. What kind of battery did you have in mind, and how long do you want to run them for?
The simplest way would be to use a 12 volt battery and a car 12V DC to 120V AC converter with the power supply for the lights plugged into it. Any other approach would involve taking the wires off the supply and rewiring them directly to a 12 volt battery. Does the light strip plug into the supply or is it permanently connected?

Keith
id like to run them at least 6 hours. Its soddered to the plug connector wires that then is plugged n screwed onto the 2 prong plug box with prongs. Did that help?
Is the light sequencing controlled by the light string itself (probably) or by the adapter (less probably)? It looks as though the cable unscrews/unplugs from the power adapter. If so, the number of connection pins/sockets in the plug would give a clue.
If the lights need 0.5A, as implied by the rating on the adapter, then you will need quite a chunky battery to keep the lights on for hours at a time.
From the end of LED 2wires are sodder on that has a 2 prong male connector that plugs into the 2prong plug box.
input: 120V ~ 60hz 0.22A
output:12V 500mA 6W
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
10,607
From the end of LED 2wires are sodder on that has a 2 prong male connector that plugs into the 2prong plug box.
In that case all the sequencing is being done by a controller in the light string, so all you need to run the lights is a 12V battery. BUT ..... 12V is just the nominal voltage of a battery. A car/motorcycle battery when fully charged will have a higher voltage, ~13.8V. Hopefully that won't over-drive the lights. To be on the safe side you could drop the voltage down a bit with 2 or 3 series diodes.
 
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