Need help building a Digital Cricket Scoreboard from scratch

Thread Starter

jasrodz

Joined Oct 20, 2020
19
Hi Everyone,

First time posting here. I'm looking at building electronic cricket scoreboard something like the below image. I want use the 7segment led for this project.

Capture.JPG

There are several threads on this forum which are quite old and I'm having difficulties to follow. Can someone point me in right direction from where to start. I have basic understanding of electronics and can soldier and understand circuits, but not good at programming. If someone has done a project of this sort and willing to share some step by step guide will also be appreciated.
 

Dodgydave

Joined Jun 22, 2012
9,686
This would be a job for a micro like PIC or Arduino, a 3 segments common Anode led multiplexed , similar to a darts scoreboard.
 

Djsarakar

Joined Jul 26, 2020
352
I think you need following things for your project

1. Microcontroller
2. Seven segment display boards
3. Keypad
4. Power supply
 

Marley

Joined Apr 4, 2016
370
Don't under estimate the amount of time and work required to do this.
A bit of careful planning goes a long way.
  • Before you get down to the nitty-gritty of the electronics think how the display will work. You need some large and bright displays. Going to be used in sunlight (hopefully). Bright means power! This display panel needs to be engineered. What if it rains? Is it waterproof?
  • How are you going to drive these displays from whatever programmable device you propose to use?
  • How are you going to enter the scores? Keyboard?
I think if I was going to do this, I would design and build the scoreboard first. It's the hardest bit.
I would use a micro-controller to read a string of serial data (ascii numbers) and put the numbers on the display. Convert from logic-levels to power for the display LEDs. A fairly complicated project in itself.
The serial string would be formatted in a certain way. Example: "S (start) - n - n - n - ... - (one per number on the scoreboard) - F (finish)".
You could test it with serial terminal s/w.
Then I would write some software to run on a PC (possibly in DotNet or Python), that would do the calculations and show your scoreboard on the PC screen (so you can check it). Then on a key-press (function key) or on-screen button would send these digits out of the serial port (or a USB to serial adaptor) in a sequence to the scoreboard.
This method should save design work and allows the scoreboard to be some distance away from the PC.
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

jasrodz

Joined Oct 20, 2020
19
Don't under estimate the amount of time and work required to do this.
A bit of careful planning goes a long way.
  • Before you get down to the nitty-gritty of the electronics think how the display will work. You need some large and bright displays. Going to be used in sunlight (hopefully). Bright means power! This display panel needs to be engineered. What if it rains? Is it waterproof?
  • How are you going to drive these displays from whatever programmable device you propose to use?
  • How are you going to enter the scores? Keyboard?
I think if I was going to do this, I would design and build the scoreboard first. It's the hardest bit.
I would use a micro-controller to read a string of serial data (ascii numbers) and put the numbers on the display. Convert from logic-levels to power for the display LEDs. A fairly complicated project in itself.
The serial string would be formatted in a certain way. Example: "S (start) - n - n - n - ... - (one per number on the scoreboard) - F (finish)".
You could test it with serial terminal s/w.
Then I would write some software to run on a PC (possibly in DotNet or Python), that would do the calculations and show your scoreboard on the PC screen (so you can check it). Then on a key-press (function key) or on-screen button would send these digits out of the serial port (or a USB to serial adaptor) in a sequence to the scoreboard.
This method should save design work and allows the scoreboard to be some distance away from the PC.
Thanks @Marley, I know this project sounds complicated. But I have seen people do it. I'm not so worried about building the board itself or display. I'm planning on using Arduino controller for this project. So I would like to know how all these go together, if there is a schematic that i can follow
 

Thread Starter

jasrodz

Joined Oct 20, 2020
19
Need the following information

  1. Which microcontroller do you have ?
  2. Which compiler do you have ?
  3. Do you have seven segment ?
  4. Do you have push buttons or keypad?
Hi @Djsarakar I'm planning on using

  1. Which microcontroller do you have ? I'm planning on using Arduino
  2. Which compiler do you have ? Not sure what this is ?
  3. Do you have seven segment ? I want to build this with SMD 5050
  4. Do you have push buttons or keypad? I can use either I'm guessing

Thanks for your help
 

Djsarakar

Joined Jul 26, 2020
352
Hi jasrodz

I think that you have chosen a very difficult task for you.You will not learn anything just by guessing To simplify this task you must first learn the basics. First of all you should buy one development board, I would prefer one including pic micro. Then select complier ide for your micro. So you can write you code on the ide

Write program for blinking led
Write program that turn on led when push button pressed
Write program for display number on seven segment.

This is all i can offer you

When you have done all this, then you will get the idea of yourself for digital scoreboard.
 

Djsarakar

Joined Jul 26, 2020
352
Thanks @Djsarakar do you have recommend any other simple and easy way if this is harder
Have you ever programmed a any microcontroller?

I told you the way in which you can divide your project into small parts. If you are serious about your project, then you should start with basic. This is my advice for you.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
759
Doesn't need a microcontroller at all. All it has to do is count up one run/over/wicket at a time (if you a prepared to press the button four or six times if there is a boundary), and to reset to zero when the batsman is out.
The venerable CD40110 is still available.https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/c...t5.com%2Fpart%2FCD40110BE%2FTexas+Instruments
Might need some drivers on the output to power the big displays, but the CD40110 will run of 18V, enough to drive any MOSFET.
 

Thread Starter

jasrodz

Joined Oct 20, 2020
19
Doesn't need a microcontroller at all. All it has to do is count up one run/over/wicket at a time (if you a prepared to press the button four or six times if there is a boundary), and to reset to zero when the batsman is out.
The venerable CD40110 is still available.https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/cd40110b.pdf?HQS=ti-null-null-sf-df-pf-sep-wwe&ts=1603589102049&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.datasheet5.com%2Fpart%2FCD40110BE%2FTexas+Instruments
Might need some drivers on the output to power the big displays, but the CD40110 will run of 18V, enough to drive any MOSFET.
Thanks @Ian0 Is there any schematic that I can follow ?
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
759
Here’s a bit of a circuit. Each section works the same.
I’ve included a “down” button for those occasions when it looks like a 6 but actually landed inside the rope, and the scorer got a bit ahead of himself.
Do overs count up or down? If “down” then I’ve included an easy way to preset the counter, by clocking the tens.
The logic can run off 12V, or 5V, it doesn’t matter.
A battery backup could be added in case someone unplugs it at tea in order to put the kettle on.
Do you play 2-innings matches? If not, then “target” can be made much simpler (drawing on lower right) as it only has to copy the “total” into a latch at the end of the first Innings.
 

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