Misterious Watts value in led (diagram)

Thread Starter

jordi 1234321

Joined Mar 15, 2016
4
I have a doubt about some numbers I'm getting in LiveWire... Can anybody explain origin of these values?

I believed that watts come from Amperes x Volts, but these ciphers are driving me crazy...

I get that

P = I * V

V = P / I (fixed)

V = 5.46 / 6.63

V = 0,8235 --- what is this number? It isn't V drop from de led, and is not V from batteries... What represents this number?

Thanks in advance!


Edit :


It's possible that the value reflects led's resistance? I mean:

P = IV

V=P/I

V = 5.46mW / 6.63mA

V = 0,82V (V "efficiently" consumed by led)

1.5V - 0.82V = 0.676V (V "wasted" by led)

calculating resistance:

V = RI

R = V/I

R = 0.676V / 6.63 mA

R = 676mV / 6.63 mA

R = 101,96 Ohm

I't possible that nearly 102 ohm are the "resistance" coming from led? Or It's implicit in V drop from led, and I'm calculating it twice?

Note 1: I know there must be a resistor, it's only a way to simplify diagram.

Note 2: The value I can't understand is 5.46 mW, I don't know what is its origin...

Any advice will be very appreciated,
Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited:

ErnieM

Joined Apr 24, 2011
8,019
What seems to have happened is you confused your simulator with a bad circuit. The led would take a huge current if connected like that. Your modeling program must have too simple a model of the led to account for that.

Try adding a series 100 ohm resistor and see if the numbers work out better.
 

Thread Starter

jordi 1234321

Joined Mar 15, 2016
4
Thanks for your comment ErnieM.
Putting a resistor still produces a strange value. Placing a 100ohm changes led values to 3.41 mA and 2.75 mW, and resulting from these is 0.806V. Not V from battery, not consuming V because remaining is 0.341V
 

Attachments

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,019
Why do you think the voltages/currents are strange? You are operating the LED in a manner where small changes in forward voltage give large(ish) changes in current.
LED-iv.jpg
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
Change your source voltage to one higher than the forward voltage of the LED, include the series resistor and then the numbers will make perfect sense..
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
163
Leds are not resistors,

In a resistor circuit,voltage , current and ohms are connected as you say., then graph of current against voltage is a straight line.

In a diode, then this is not so, as shown above by some one, the current flowing a diode measured against voltage is not a straight line, as you increase the voltage, current stays very low, then at a certain voltage, the current will start increasing significantly with voltage.

A led will typicaly not conduct till a set voltage , dependent upon many things, but in the range of a volt or so.
So for a led , battery circuit, if you apply a voltage below this , then the led wont turn on, above this, the led will light and drop an almost constant voltage . As you increase the voltage , the led will still drop the same voltage , just take more current.
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
What seems to have happened is you confused your simulator with a bad circuit. The led would take a huge current if connected like that. Your modeling program must have too simple a model of the led to account for that.

Try adding a series 100 ohm resistor and see if the numbers work out better.
AFAICR: Only IR LEDs have low enough Vf to do anything at 1.5V. Red is about 1.8V, Green is 2.0V and blue/white is about 3.4V.
 

Veracohr

Joined Jan 3, 2011
695
The OP is asking why the simulator's power and current measurements for the LED work out to a strange voltage value.

I don't know why but just ignore it. The voltage across the LED is TP1-TP2.
 

Thread Starter

jordi 1234321

Joined Mar 15, 2016
4
I started thinking that simulator has its own values, It does not seem realistic to me... Strange values are a constant whatever cell or resistance I try. Maybe livewire is kidding me hahaha

I will move forward, maybe I find a solution in the future :)

Thanks again and regards!
 

Thread Starter

jordi 1234321

Joined Mar 15, 2016
4
Thank you everybody for your comments... Now I know that simulation software is not a magical tool... It has bugs and oddities too, reality is the best simulator!
(just hope don't burn many expensive components trying hehe)

Regards!
 
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