Making a treadmill motor work with 110v outlet?

Thread Starter

BurlyWoodworks

Joined Nov 14, 2018
32
Hello everyone. I'm working on a new project I've been hoping to do for quite a while now, and finally getting around to building it. My project idea is converting a Log Splitter into a Forging Press so I can maneuver my steel easier. What do I need help with?

My problem is that I need to run it off of an Electric motor, rather than a gas powered motor (faster, easier, and less costly to run). I have a Treadmill motor that I've had lying around for while, but it not longer has the electrical components on it to run on a 110v outlet. It came from a friend that got it from a Treadmill, but removed all of the electrical components for it. All that's left of it are 4 wires: Black, Red, Blue, and another clipped blue wire...

My problem is that I need to run this motor on a 110v outlet, I believe this is a 130v motor, but I have no idea how to do so... I'm not sure what phase it is either, the motor doesn't state much information (so I think). I'm 15 yrs old, I'm still in a learning process, but if someone can walk me through what to do to get this running off of an outlet, with a variable speed dial and/ or on;off switch... I would greatly appreciate it. Here are a few photos of the motor (links), I've also attached them as a file.

https://ibb.co/k6fB20
https://ibb.co/hWadh0
https://ibb.co/g0Jyh0



I appreciate your time, thank you!
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,451
If a T.M. motor it is most likely a DC brushed motor, so a DC controller is needed.
You can get anything from a simple PWM controller off ebay.
A power tool Triac 'Dimmer' style controller using a bridge Rectifier after it.
Or the more sophisticated T.M. boards such as the MC60 or the MC2100.
There is also KB controllers on ebay along side the T.M. drives.
You may not need the blue wires, they are a temp sensor.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

BurlyWoodworks

Joined Nov 14, 2018
32
If a T.M. motor it is most likely a DC brushed motor, so a DC controller is needed.
You can get anything from a simple PWM controller off ebay.
A power tool Triac 'Dimmer' style controller using a bridge Rectifier after it.
Or the more sophisticated T.M. boards such as the MC60 or the MC2100.
There is also KB controllers on ebay along side the T.M. drives.
You may not need the blue wires, they are a temp sensor.
Max.
Thank you! Is there a chance you can me some links to everything I need to get? I looked up on ebay the controller, but can't find anything larger than 60v... The other parts I'm having some trouble finding, I might be missing something.

Thank you, Max!
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
7,963
My project idea is converting a Log Splitter into a Forging Press so I can maneuver my steel easier.
Having been around both of those things over the years, I'd love to see how your doing that conversion. Or by the term, "forging press" you are meaning hydraulic press?
 

Thread Starter

BurlyWoodworks

Joined Nov 14, 2018
32
Having been around both of those things over the years, I'd love to see how your doing that conversion. Or by the term, "forging press" you are meaning hydraulic press?

Yes, exactly. Log splitters are (most of the time) gas or electric Hydrualic presses... The motor turns the Hydrualic pump, and the pump will pump the hydrualic fluid into the cylinder... The motor, in most, are gas... But, gas is a little costly to use and less efficient for what I need, so I'm hoping I can swap out the gas motor for an Electric motor... Which is where the treadmill motor comes in. :)
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
7,963
Yes, exactly. Log splitters are (most of the time) gas or electric Hydrualic presses... The motor turns the Hydrualic pump, and the pump will pump the hydrualic fluid into the cylinder... The motor, in most, are gas... But, gas is a little costly to use and less efficient for what I need, so I'm hoping I can swap out the gas motor for an Electric motor... Which is where the treadmill motor comes in. :)
The reason I asked was a forging press uses a weight that moves kind of fast, like the Little Giant type of forge press. Couldn't see a log splitter being able to move like that. Another thing you might consider building to do actual forge work would be a helve hammer - https://www.google.com/search?q=helve+hammer+images&client=firefox-b-1&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwilsM3z-dTeAhWynuAKHYfFC4EQ7Al6BAgFECM&biw=1024&bih=632 There are a lot of plans online for building them and they work pretty good.
 

Thread Starter

BurlyWoodworks

Joined Nov 14, 2018
32
The reason I asked was a forging press uses a weight that moves kind of fast, like the Little Giant type of forge press. Couldn't see a log splitter being able to move like that. Another thing you might consider building to do actual forge work would be a helve hammer - https://www.google.com/search?q=helve+hammer+images&client=firefox-b-1&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwilsM3z-dTeAhWynuAKHYfFC4EQ7Al6BAgFECM&biw=1024&bih=632 There are a lot of plans online for building them and they work pretty good.

Oh noooo haha not one like that... Those ones are usually pneumatic, or they are mechanically driven... A forging press is a hydrualic press, meant to move slow, but moves material a lot faster. A 'power hammer' is what you're thinking of, those one's are quick hammer movements, presses are squishing the steel... For my use though, power hammers are way too loud and expensive... A forge press on the other hand, is perfect for making Damascus Steel, which is what I'm mainly gonna use it for. :)

Here's a link to a basic idea of what i'm shooting for...

 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
7,963
A forging press is a hydrualic press, meant to move slow, but moves material a lot faster
Your press will after a fact be a "forging press" but is a poor second to a hammer if your trying to make Damascus, The video shows at the lead in what looks like a start to making "canister damascus". but then it shows him just doing some part manipulation. Part manipulation is not truly forging. Damascus take impact, forging takes impact. Don't believe all you see on Youtube, they don't show you their failures.
 

Thread Starter

BurlyWoodworks

Joined Nov 14, 2018
32
Your press will after a fact be a "forging press" but is a poor second to a hammer if your trying to make Damascus, The video shows at the lead in what looks like a start to making "canister damascus". but then it shows him just doing some part manipulation. Part manipulation is not truly forging. Damascus take impact, forging takes impact. Don't believe all you see on Youtube, they don't show you their failures.

I'm sorry but I'm not getting what you're saying... All I'm looking to make is the press, and the press alone at this point... My only problem is that I need to run it off of electric so I don't make the whole neighborhood mad lol.

I'm not sure what you mean by what you said, but I'm not making this because of what he used it for in the video... I'm making it because I need it for what I'm using it for... He didn't make any damascus in the video, I believe all he did was some testing... Nothing like I'm planning to do.
I'm fully aware what damascus is, I've made many billets of damascus steel before; but you get to the point where it's a real pain to forge it all by hand... Forge-welding is forging steel upon steel, to make it a solid 'new' bar of steel... Which results in a pattern. I'm moving towards a more professional impact of the hobby, which is why a Press would really push me forward to so I can maneuver the steel easier, and faster.
I'm not sure what you mean by "don't believe all you see on youtube, they don't show you their failures"... This video isn't the only research I've done on this project... I've done a full breakthrough on how it's made, how it works, every component, etc... If there's any problems along the way, I know enough to figure out what's wrong and how to fix it.

Why would I choose to go with a press rather than a hammer then? Well, to get the power I need to move the steel; it's going to be around a $1500 build to get a power hammer to have, well, the 'power' to do that... A press on the other hand, is hydraulics... It's a lot stronger, it's a lot faster, it's a lot easier to use, it's a lot cheaper, and it's a lot quieter... There's a few differences between a forging press and a power hammer... Power hammers 'hammer' the steel at a fast rate, forging press 'squishes' the steel at a slower rate... I'm not looking for an alternative to a power hammer, I'm looking for an alternative to a forge-press.

The only part I'm not sure about though is converting this motor over to work with a 110v plug again, so I can turn the hydraulic pump to pump fluid into the cylinder, which thus provides the power to 'squish' the steel. I may be 15 yrs old, but I know a heck of a lot about the whole forging, building, and covering process and what to do... Just not the electrical part of it... ;)
 

Thread Starter

BurlyWoodworks

Joined Nov 14, 2018
32
If you still want to pursue it, I would use one of the power tool type AC Triac 'Dimmers' an pick up a 50amp bridge to wire between the dimmer and the motor, just bring the motor up to speed manually in a coupler of seconds.
Max.

Is something like this you're talking about?



Thanks for your help, it's much appreciated!
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
7,963
He didn't make any damascus in the video, I believe all he did was some testing
Look again at the lead picture of the Youtube. It plainly shows a welded canister, a square tube with two ends welded on it, and the canister gets filled with various bits of steel. Canister damascus is not the same as pattern damascus that most people are familiar with. I worked with and helped a guy years ago trying out different ways to make damascus for his blades, and they all needed in the end impact to get consistant welds, just pressing it in the press you show will make it thinner but won't make real damascus steel worth any thing. If it did the companies making damascus professionally wouldn't have forge hammers and the noise to worry about. In the end if your not seeing sparks from the steel when it's being forged your not getting welds.

While never making damascus for myself, I do own a small coal forge that I used to make thing with. That is why Andy asked for my help in getting his damascus project figured out.
 

Thread Starter

BurlyWoodworks

Joined Nov 14, 2018
32
I'm not sure what your argument is... He didn't make any canister damascus in the video, the thumbnail of the video is just part of the ram before he painted it blue... If you look at 2:52, all he's doing is taking what looks like a canister damascus, and welding it to the cylinder... It wasn't a canister damascus, it was the ram that he welded to the hydraulic cylinder... I've made canister damascus before, I actually made a youtube video on it; but I'm not sure why you're telling me how canister damascus is made and such... I know how to work canister damascus and damascus steel, and what the differences are; but I wasn't asking about what to use the press for, I was just asking how to wire the motor... I'm not making the press because he forged something with it, or made canister damascus... I'm just making one because I need one, so that I can make larger billets of damascus steel... I planned to make one of these much before I saw this video, I'm just using it as a reference to what my plans are to use the motor for. Just something to help me weld and draw out steel easier.:)
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
7,963
Then why not just get a common "C" frame induction motor and mount you pump to it? Hydraulic pumps unless connected to a gas engine use a regulator to control pressure not motor speed. Even most every hydraulic piece of equipment, back hoes , dozers etc, keep the motor running at a constant governed speed and use a regulator. A log splitter is usually even used this way, full speed on the motor. C frame motors are on Craig's list all of the time, swimming pool pump motors, for next to nothing.

Gas engine powered log splitters can get away without the regulator because the motor isn't powerful enough to break the cylinder. Electric motors put out there highest power in "stall", so there is a real chance of breaking something when using electric powered hydraulics. Do some reading on the subject.
 
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