Looking for a Small Programmer.

Thread Starter

R!f@@

Joined Apr 2, 2009
9,647
I am looking for small standalone PIC Programmer.
I do not need debugging.
I need to program a lotta PIC's. I can do with EasyPIC 7 but it is a bit of a hassle you know.

Just need to plug it in to the ICSP port and program and the move to next PCB, fast.

Something like PICKit but dunno what to chose. I had a bad experience with PICKit so far
It should support 16F, 18F and Up.

I will be using mikroProg Suite For PIC to Program so as you know it should be a USB.

Any one got any idea ?
I do not mind making one if any one can point one to me but I doubt it would support 18F and Up.

Thanks
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
18,864
If you use a Pickit 2 you can use the Pickit2 stand-alone programmer that everyone complained was not supplied with Pickit 3.
The only problem is whether the Pic is a much later type that is not supported by the Pickit2.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

R!f@@

Joined Apr 2, 2009
9,647
I need later chips in future like 24F and DSP's , for now 16F and 18F.

I found this.

Untitled.png

What does that exactly mean ?
I am sorta in production but just one PIC at a time.
 

nerdegutta

Joined Dec 15, 2009
2,660
I'd guess that production programmer is used in large scale production, and I've read somewhere that it has the ability to check for extreme voltages during programming/production. The PICkit3 use power from the device, and takes whatever voltages it gets.

If you have a few thousand PICs to program, I'd guess you'd like to program them in a kind of pick-n-place environment.

I might be wrong... :rolleyes:
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
24,577
"Looking for a Small Programmer." -- I know a programmer that is about 5' 2" -- is that small enough? :D
 

Thread Starter

R!f@@

Joined Apr 2, 2009
9,647
@nerdegutta Not 1000's, around 100.
I guess I can use it eh !

@WBahn..... 5'2". ??? HA ! Ur programmer is shorter than me.. :cool:
Still, make it smaller and show it to me . :D
 

Thread Starter

R!f@@

Joined Apr 2, 2009
9,647
I will let the thread be in the frying pan to see how well done it gets.

So what will I buy ??
A PICKit 3 or .........
 

nerdegutta

Joined Dec 15, 2009
2,660
@nerdegutta Not 1000's, around 100.
I have no number of how many times I've used my PICkit3. I got two of them, and sometimes, when things are a bit hectic around my ears, I have them both connected to my computer, with two different projects open in MPLAB X, with different MCU's on the breadboards, and it works just fine.
 

JohnInTX

Joined Jun 26, 2012
3,773
I'd guess that production programmer is used in large scale production, and I've read somewhere that it has the ability to check for extreme voltages during programming/production. The PICkit3 use power from the device, and takes whatever voltages it gets.

If you have a few thousand PICs to program, I'd guess you'd like to program them in a kind of pick-n-place environment.

I might be wrong... :rolleyes:
Nope, you are correct. The ProMate programmers (I, II and PM3) can vary the bus voltage to look for dropouts, cells not fully erased etc. Whether it can do the varying voltages when programming in-circuit depends on the circuit - varying Vdd usually means that Vdd for the PIC (and probably the board, too) is supplied by the programmer. There are limits to how much current it can supply (500ma?) and what else might be on the busses that affects rise times etc. If things are such that a ProMate can't drive the bus, you can set it for using target power and it just programs and verifies at the target's Vdd level so you don't get the verification at varying Vdd. The development programmers (ICD, PICkit, PicStart etc.) don't have the voltage controls so can't do those tests either.

That said, I know large outfits programming for production with PICkit with no problems and even though I used to program lots of DIPs for production with a ProMate, I can't recall one ever successfully programming then failing the Vdd range tests. It probably happens but never to me.

If I could buy something more than a PK3 for programming but still had a limited budget I'd buy a RealICE before a PM3. RealICE isn't a production programmer either but you then have a great debug tool - especially if you get the add-ons. The flash-based chips just don't seem to have many programming problems that would justify the additional cost of the PM3.

I also would not buy any but genuine uCHIP stuff but that's just me..

YMMV
 
Last edited:

TQFP44

Joined Sep 3, 2016
53
I have no number of how many times I've used my PICkit3. I got two of them,
Ditto, Do not have any problems with my PK3's , with PIC's 24,18,16, and MPLABX, there is stand-alone SW as well , but I have not needed it.
 

Thread Starter

R!f@@

Joined Apr 2, 2009
9,647
I do not debug and I will not be supplying the board from the programmer. PCB will be powered separately.
RealICE is a bit too much.

So a PICKit3 then ?
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,231
Generally, I have my PICs preprogrammed by Microchip prior to delivery to my board assembly house.

With that said, I also add programming test points (pads) onto my PCBs for reprogramming later if necessary. My board testers include a port to connect an ICD3. This way I can program and test at the same time.
 

Thread Starter

R!f@@

Joined Apr 2, 2009
9,647
See this.

TS says "I love my EasyPICv7 for development but it just can't do ICSP"

I do not understand....I do ICSP using dupont jumpers from EasyPICv7 to my PCB. It was easy, but a bit of a hassle.
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
7,983
See this.

TS says "I love my EasyPICv7 for development but it just can't do ICSP"

I do not understand....I do ICSP using dupont jumpers from EasyPICv7 to my PCB. It was easy, but a bit of a hassle.
Some people have trouble with Icsp because the load on a pin is too high, capacitance is too high or input voltages to a programming pin wash the signal. If you design it right, it should work right.
 

nerdegutta

Joined Dec 15, 2009
2,660
Do you have any of these:

PIC 18F452
PIC 16F1454
PIC 16F527
PIC 16F716
PIC 16F688
PIC 16F690
PIC 16F877A
PIC 16F628A

Then you could make a circuit, with a program, that blinks an LED, compile it, and send the *.HEX file to me. Then I'll make the same circuit in my workshop, and try to program it with MPLAB IPE (Integraded Programming Environment).

If I can mange to load the *.HEX file into my PICkit3, and use it as a standalone, then there's nothing to hold you back in using MicroC and PICkit3...
 
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