I'm looking for a "small" Flip-Flop IC

Thread Starter

tubbadu

Joined Feb 4, 2023
5
Hello there! I'm looking for a THT flip flop IC that I'd like to use as a 1 bit counter, using a push button as "clock"
every IC that I found is just so big, as it usually has multiple flipflops in it, with a lot of pins that I don't need. Is there a single Flip flop IC, with less than 16 pins? possibly low power (it should be battery powered)

thanks in advance!
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
4,227
Have you considered using an 8 pin microcontroller such as a PIC12F1840 or ATtiny 13 etc. That would save having to use components to de bounce the push button contacts. The de bounce could be done in software.

Les.
 

Thread Starter

tubbadu

Joined Feb 4, 2023
5
If you want a really small device you may have to forego THT and use a surface-mount device
this would also work, but how do I solder it to my breadboard?


Have you considered using an 8 pin microcontroller such as a PIC12F1840 or ATtiny
this would be really nice, but I can't find cheap ATtiny chips, they are all over 3.50€ in local stores and not less than 1€ in online stores like eBay and Aliexpress, plus shipping fees that would make them cost the same as local stores...

https://it.farnell.com/en-IT/nexperia/74ahc74bq-q100x/ic-flip-flop/dp/3936191 i hope this link will be helpful for you to find Flip Flop IC in Italy
thanks, but I'm looking for a THT device, I have to manually solder it to a PCB
 

Thread Starter

tubbadu

Joined Feb 4, 2023
5
You might be happier with a THT module based on a tiny SMT chip
Search eBay and aliExpress for something like this...
https://www.ebay.com/itm/3V-24V-5A-...f-1f9a-427b-9663-fdb634005272&redirect=mobile
cool! what's that chip with most of its pin soldered together? Do you thing I'd be able to reproduce this using just that chip (if it's really that chip the flipflop)?

This thread provides some information on soldering surface mount devices with a soldering iron.

Click on the link above. I performed a search for “soldering surface mount” on this forum. There are several threads which you may find useful. This is just one and post #2 describes the basic process.
I'll try with some salvaged SMD chip that lay there in my component box unused, thanks!



By breadboard I assume you mean printed circuit board?
You could mount it Manhattan style, with thin tinned copper wires soldered to the chip and to the board.
I'll try! thanks!
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
4,227
The chip with a number of pins linked together on the module that MrSalts linked to in post # 11 will be a mosfet that will switch the output on and off.

Les.
 

ronsimpson

Joined Oct 7, 2019
3,215
Here is a 8 pin FF. Works at 1.8 to 3.3V not 5V.
1675522319146.png
Here is a 5 pin FF that works at 5V. link
Search for SN74AUCG1____ and you will find a family of small logic. SN74LVC1G---- The "1G" is key!
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
21,313
The reason that single THT flip-flops do not exist is that few if any manufacturers use THT in their products anymore. The transition began in the mid 1990's and is now complete for all practical purposes. There simply is no appreciable demand for THT products anymore. This does make prototyping and experimentation more difficult, but the semiconductor companies could care less. They never made any money from hobbyists and experimenters in the first place. It just means we have to improve our skills and be more creative in our fabrication technique.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
34,842
You need a low wattage (preferably temperature controlled) soldering iron with a pointed tip to solder the surface mount devices, using small diameter lead solder.
The chip should in the largest package it comes in with leads, such as the SOT-23.
 
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