Lighting

Thread Starter

Misty1

Joined Feb 13, 2021
9
Hi all,
I'm a complete novice and hoping someone could help me with my lighting project.
It's a mains-powered light fitting in a cabinet. I think the fitting used to be spring-loaded at both ends but now it's lost the ability to spring back and hold the bulb in place.
This may be a daft question - can I put some foil in between the bulb and fitting at one or both ends to restore the connection?
Thanks for reading and any help offered.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,723
I have seen the foil trick used before, and I am the one who was called to repair the damage. My suggestion is to replace the failed socket with a good one, since I am not available to repair the damage.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
23,505
I have seen a poor contact in a bulb socket get very hot and almost start a house fire. You wouldn't want that to happen.
 

Thread Starter

Misty1

Joined Feb 13, 2021
9
I have seen the foil trick used before, and I am the one who was called to repair the damage. My suggestion is to replace the failed socket with a good one, since I am not available to repair the damage.
Thanks very much for your answer MisterBill2, thought id
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,084
Hi all,
I'm a complete novice and hoping someone could help me with my lighting project.
It's a mains-powered light fitting in a cabinet. I think the fitting used to be spring-loaded at both ends but now it's lost the ability to spring back and hold the bulb in place.
This may be a daft question - can I put some foil in between the bulb and fitting at one or both ends to restore the connection?
Thanks for reading and any help offered.
What is the technology of the lamp (incandescent etc) and size?
Max.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,723
For a connection carrying current that starts to arc, the temperature of that arc is over 1000 degrees, and not only can it evaporate copper, it can evaporate many metals and it is plenty hot enough to start a fire. And even if there is nothing around to burn, that much heat will do damage. That is the reason to be sure there is no chance of arcing.
 
I've "repaired" an incandescent lamp by adding solder. Intermittent connections cause heat and the heat weakens the springy contacts. You would like to remove any oxidation without removing the plating. Toothpaste is a mild abrasive. You can try rebending the contact.

When you install lamps anywhere in the future use either dielectric grease or a layer of vaseline on the threads of an incadesent bulb, the ends of a florescent tube or the lamps in your car. Just do it all the time.

I'm going to mention something that probably isn't a problem, but switches/relays have a minimum "wetting"current that's required, otherwise a non-conductive oxide develops on the contacts.
 

Thread Starter

Misty1

Joined Feb 13, 2021
9
What is the technology of the lamp (incandescent etc) and size?
Max.
Hi Max,
Thanks very much for your reply. Having read the other replies, I realised earlier that this isn't the easy, quick repair I hoped it would be and way out of my depth.
Misty
 

Thread Starter

Misty1

Joined Feb 13, 2021
9
I've "repaired" an incandescent lamp by adding solder. Intermittent connections cause heat and the heat weakens the springy contacts. You would like to remove any oxidation without removing the plating. Toothpaste is a mild abrasive. You can try rebending the contact.

When you install lamps anywhere in the future use either dielectric grease or a layer of vaseline on the threads of an incadesent bulb, the ends of a florescent tube or the lamps in your car. Just do it all the time.

I'm going to mention something that probably isn't a problem, but switches/relays have a minimum "wetting"current that's required, otherwise a non-conductive oxide develops on the contacts.
Thanks very much for your reply. Have learnt quite a bit as well
 

Thread Starter

Misty1

Joined Feb 13, 2021
9
For a connection carrying current that starts to arc, the temperature of that arc is over 1000 degrees, and not only can it evaporate copper, it can evaporate many metals and it is plenty hot enough to start a fire. And even if there is nothing around to burn, that much heat will do damage. That is the reason to be sure there is no chance of arcing.
Got it thanks MisterBill2.
 
Top