In technical school at 35 trying to learn a trade in industrial elecricity/electronics.

Thread Starter

bussery

Joined Mar 2, 2016
5
This past year I decided to pursue an associates degree in industrial electricity/electronics. I have no background in the field and wanted to learn from scratch. I took an electricity class as a minor a few years ago and remember most of the basics. I'm not really learning much from my instructor because he just reads the slides (and I'm perfectly capable of reading myself).Then test time we get a study guide with all the answers, take the test and move on. I'm wondering if the fast pace and lack of understanding is going to hurt me in the long run or will I learn most of what I need to know if/when I get a job in the field?

Also in labs if I don't understand he basically just gives the answers. I'm on transformers now, and I find it relatively easy. But everything dealing with electric motors, semi conductors, and digital logic I don't understand at all even though I was able to pass the tests. I can study and pass things with little to no practical application or knowledge of how to use what I learned.
 
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dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
8,874
Welcome to AAC!

I've known of a number of teachers who couldn't actually teach and just read what was in the book and only knew how to solve a problem one way; the way it was done in the teacher material. Fortunately, I never had one for a teacher...

If you don't understand what you're doing, even though you pass the tests, then you're not learning the material. At least you know that you don't understand the fundamentals; that's the first step towards acquiring them.

Are other teachers available? Are there any classmates you can form a study group with? Is this a reputable school? Accredited and placing a high percentage of graduates in their field of study?

Teaching isn't supposed to teach you everything, it's supposed to teach you how to think so you can expand on what you were taught. I learned the basics in school, but most of what I know came from applying what I learned.
 

tranzz4md

Joined Apr 10, 2015
314
Unfortunately, your profile indicates that you live in an area where unions, like the IBEW, CWA, IAM, and others are nearly non-existent. If you lived near Chicago, New York, LA, San Francisco, Seattle, Pittsburgh, Portland, or others you could get into an apprenticeship program and not only get well trained and educated (including a degree), but be paid for your work to do it. If you really want to make a profession of it, move to one of those places, and go for it. Otherwise, you can surf a lot of "tech schools" and learn very little for the price you pay. You are not too old for this.

If you wish to stay in your current area, there must be a market and demand for workers with the skills you want to learn, or no legitimate schools will offer that type of training.
 

Thread Starter

bussery

Joined Mar 2, 2016
5
Well the name of the school is Southern Union State Community College. I understand most of the basics of electricity I just think that they are rushing us through with "mini terms" as opposed to full semesters. I think that if I had full semesters I could get the understanding I need. The degree program it seems is focused on industrial maintenance as opposed to just straight up electrician. There is another school across the border (I live on the Alabama/Georgia border) that has one that's more focused on being an electrician and I think I may be better off going there in the fall and finishing up my time there.
 

Thread Starter

bussery

Joined Mar 2, 2016
5
I'm still lacking a lot of understanding on induction motors, and semi conductors, and logic.. which I don't get why I would need that if i don't want to do industrial maintenance.
 

Thread Starter

bussery

Joined Mar 2, 2016
5
Welcome to AAC!

I've known of a number of teachers who couldn't actually teach and just read what was in the book and only knew how to solve a problem one way; the way it was done in the teacher material. Fortunately, I never had one for a teacher...

If you don't understand what you're doing, even though you pass the tests, then you're not learning the material. At least you know that you don't understand the fundamentals; that's the first step towards acquiring them.

Are other teachers available? Are there any classmates you can form a study group with? Is this a reputable school? Accredited and placing a high percentage of graduates in their field of study?

Teaching isn't supposed to teach you everything, it's supposed to teach you how to think so you can expand on what you were taught. I learned the basics in school, but most of what I know came from applying what I learned.
I don't think there are other teachers available for what's being taught. I think there's one other in the department but he teaches the AC/DC fundamentals class. I have a grasp on bits and pieces but a lot of things aren't "clicking" I guess I would call it. And it's difficult for me to say what I don't understand because I don't know where to begin.
 

Thread Starter

bussery

Joined Mar 2, 2016
5
Unfortunately, your profile indicates that you live in an area where unions, like the IBEW, CWA, IAM, and others are nearly non-existent. If you lived near Chicago, New York, LA, San Francisco, Seattle, Pittsburgh, Portland, or others you could get into an apprenticeship program and not only get well trained and educated (including a degree), but be paid for your work to do it. If you really want to make a profession of it, move to one of those places, and go for it. Otherwise, you can surf a lot of "tech schools" and learn very little for the price you pay. You are not too old for this.

If you wish to stay in your current area, there must be a market and demand for workers with the skills you want to learn, or no legitimate schools will offer that type of training.
Yeah I'm kind of rooted in my area at this point because I don't make enough to save to be able to move anywhere like those areas. I'm using my G.I. Bill to go to school now. I would love an apprenticeship program, I'd probably learn more with that, coupled with school work.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
8,874
I have a grasp on bits and pieces but a lot of things aren't "clicking" I guess I would call it. And it's difficult for me to say what I don't understand because I don't know where to begin.
For circuit problems make sure you understand how every value was derived and the function of every component in the circuit. If you can't do that, you don't understand the circuit.

For those cases, post the circuit and your understanding of how the circuit works in the Homework Help forum. In that forum, members will try to guide you to the answer instead of just giving it to you; which wouldn't be as helpful.
 
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