HOW does voltage lead current in an inductive circuit?

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,272
I've always heard it like, as you put it, spider weber. But this isn't surprising. It is rare that a book author will indicate pronunciation and so readers have no choice but to use the rules of pronunciation they know. I knew one kid that was extremely bright but was largely self-taught via reading, so when you talked to him he was always using extremely weird pronunciations for things, particularly names even of very famous people, and sometimes he had to spell a name out before I knew who he was talking about. And that worked in reverse -- he wouldn't recognize that the two of you were talking about the same person until something in the conversation made it obvious that that it had to be the same person.

Arguable what's most important is that people that speak the same language largely agree on how to spell and pronounce words such as this. When it comes to communicating with people that speak another language we expect there to be difficulties and differences that just have to be dealt with.
 

recklessrog

Joined May 23, 2013
985
I thought if you shout in English loud enough that Germans can understand you. You can't take the Saxon out of Anglo-Saxon.
As Basil Fawlty said, (John Clees, Fawlty towers)......... "Oh, you're German, I thought there was something wrong with you"!!! :) (and yes, the Germans DO have a sense of humour)
 

kubeek

Joined Sep 20, 2005
5,682
The German pronunciation (and Polish) of W is V, as in Wolkswagen is correctly pronounced Volksvagen. So should not the Weber be correctly pronounced? I guess it's like Mainwaring, pronounced Mannering.
The company name si Volkswagen, which si why the logo is VW, and is pronounced folksvahgn. Initial V is allways pronounced F, just like initial S is pronounced Z, so Siemens is pronounced Zeemens in Germany.
Weber is indeed pronounced like a spider web, but with the E not silent, som more like web-er instead of webr.
 

recklessrog

Joined May 23, 2013
985
The company name si Volkswagen, which si why the logo is VW, and is pronounced folksvahgn. Initial V is allways pronounced F, just like initial S is pronounced Z, so Siemens is pronounced Zeemens in Germany.

Weber is indeed pronounced like a spider web, but with the E not silent, som more like web-er instead of webr.
Yes indeed, thanks, I have quoted your correction in my post :)
 
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ronv

Joined Nov 12, 2008
3,770
So it's not a Veber grill?
Once went with a venture capitalist to visit Siemens. His name was Nywood Woo, but he went by Woody.
Checking into the hotel there was a mix up with reservations so the clerk ask his name again.
Long story short it ended up Voo Who?
Very sad. :(
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,258
My 1st cousin was a Marine. A guy in his squad (platoon? whatever) had only initials W.P. for his first and middle names. The corps handled that by placing his name on the recruit list as W. only P. only. First day of boot camp, the drill sergeant read roll. When he got to W.P. Johnson, he shouted out "Wonly Ponly". No answer. Getting louder and angrier each time, he continued to call out "Wonly PONLY" until private Johnson finally realized what was happening. W.P. was know as Wonly Ponly for the rest of his service.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,272
Hey reckless,

What is a screened lead?
It's a potential sales contact that has been selected using some criteria. Salesmen spend lots of money for lists of screened leads as it presumably drastically reduces the time wasted on cold call rejections.

Oh, wait, different kind of lead.
 
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