High Power LED Identification

Thread Starter

jc0r

Joined Oct 15, 2013
16
Hi all

I am looking to identify the LED pictured in this post please. Its from a high brightness LED display (2500nits). I have 3 LEDs that are damaged and am looking to replace them. They measure approx. 4mm x 1mm. Any advice is very welcome.

Many thanks

 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,691
The critical parameters are operating current and forward voltage. Also color matters a bit. CREE is one company that makes a lot of LEDs DigiKey sells a lot of LRD devices and they do list the variables mentioned. And their online catalog is good.
 

Thread Starter

jc0r

Joined Oct 15, 2013
16
Many thanks for the information. Do you know of a way that I could obtain the forward voltage and current while the leds are in circuit? Or a way I can identify the led I'm working with? I have 3 damaged leds, which knock out the whole line that they are on. I can make their respective lines illuminate again by making a link between both contact points where the dead led sat, but this makes the whole line a lot brighter, I'm assuming because there is less resistance with one led removed.
 

Thread Starter

jc0r

Joined Oct 15, 2013
16
Just another note, I have tried testing with a multi meter set on ohms on any one of the remaining working leds, and while they illuminate, I just get a reading of 1.
 

oz93666

Joined Sep 7, 2010
737
The pictured led is an "SMD" ... they come in different sizes ... 2835, 3528, 3020, 3030, 3535, 3014, 4014, 5050, 5060 and 5730.

The numbers give the dimensions . From your picture it looks 4.0mm long and 1.4mm wide , it's a 4014 , and from it's color cool white.

These are used in lighting products ... not usually sold separately , as soldering is extremely tricky , high chance of overheating and blowing them ...

Good luck trying to replace them!
 
Last edited:

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,691
You can meter the voltage across an led in a working segment.
But you need to use a voltmeter with a higher input resistance. A digital meter would be fine, but a cheap analog voltmeter will have some effect on the voltages. If you see the brightness change then you know it is happening.

And if you have strings with one failed LED then quite probably they are running at a higher current than they are intended to run at, or else they may not have been adequately bonded with the heat sink material. Heat shortens the life of LEDs. So temperature versus lifetime is always a compromise.
 
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