" Help me out while selecting a microcontroller "

Thread Starter

mishra87

Joined Jan 17, 2016
908
Hello All,

I want to select a microcontroller so could anybody what should my basic selection criteria.
and i also want distinguish in terms of whether it should be 8 bit or 16 bit or 32 bit or 64 bit .

Thanks in Advance !!!
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,805
Hello All,

I want to select a microcontroller so could anybody what should my basic selection criteria.
and i also want distinguish in terms of whether it should be 8 bit or 16 bit or 32 bit or 64 bit .

Thanks in Advance !!!
You have given us nothing to go on in terms of your requirements or your application. Given that we are not mind readers, I can say that any device you select has a good chance of meeting your requirements. Even if that turns out not to be the case you will have learned something that will inform your next choice.
 

Thread Starter

mishra87

Joined Jan 17, 2016
908
You have given us nothing to go on in terms of your requirements or your application. Given that we are not mind readers, I can say that any device you select has a good chance of meeting your requirements. Even if that turns out not to be the case you will have learned something that will inform your next choice.
Actually i was asking basic fundamentals requirement for selecting a microcontroller
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,088
Your choice will be affected somewhat by what language you plan to use. Some people begin with simple, 8-bit chips like the Microchip 12F5xx series and Assembly language. Others who want to program in C may also begin with a simpler chip, but from appearances on this site and others, those who program in C will often begin with advanced 8-bit chips, 16-bit, or 32-bit chips.

The most important question is what do you plan to do with the microcontroller? Second, do you have experience with any programming language?

John
 

Thread Starter

mishra87

Joined Jan 17, 2016
908
Your choice will be affected somewhat by what language you plan to use. Some people begin with simple, 8-bit chips like the Microchip 12F5xx series and Assembly language. Others who want to program in C may also begin with a simpler chip, but from appearances on this site and others, those who program in C will often begin with advanced 8-bit chips, 16-bit, or 32-bit chips.

The most important question is what do you plan to do with the microcontroller? Second, do you have experience with any programming language?

John
I am not c programmer.
Just Hardware point of view if i need to select a microcontroller for a application. what should i look for.
That's all my doubt .
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,088
About 10 years ago, I faced a similar question. I was building a piece of hardware and got tired of using discrete logic devices. I had done a little programming in Basic (circa 1980), and when I looked at Microchip Assembly, it made sense to me. My focus at the time was getting the hardware built and working, not learning a new language.

I have since wondered about moving to C, but have not done so, mainly because my emphasis has been on things, and there are big gaps between projects. Sure, C facilitates doing many things, but a library of Assembly routines helps reduce that advantage.

Again, if you can describe your application in more detail you will get lots of advice from many sources, including professional embedded software designers at AAC. Also, is programming something you will be doing every week for the rest of your working life, or is this project just a one-time affair? If it is going to be your livelihood, then the balance shifts strongly toward learning C -- if not now, very soon.

John
 

Thread Starter

mishra87

Joined Jan 17, 2016
908
About 10 years ago, I faced a similar question. I was building a piece of hardware and got tired of using discrete logic devices. I had done a little programming in Basic (circa 1980), and when I looked at Microchip Assembly, it made sense to me. My focus at the time was getting the hardware built and working, not learning a new language.

I have since wondered about moving to C, but have not done so, mainly because my emphasis has been on things, and there are big gaps between projects. Sure, C facilitates doing many things, but a library of Assembly routines helps reduce that advantage.

Again, if you can describe your application in more detail you will get lots of advice from many sources, including professional embedded software designers at AAC. Also, is programming something you will be doing every week for the rest of your working life, or is this project just a one-time affair? If it is going to be your livelihood, then the balance shifts strongly toward learning C -- if not now, very soon.

John
I Completely agree with your suggestions.
But i am still far away from my answer.

Lets i have to build up a hardware controller based circuit for my design and programming work a software engineer will do .
So now how do i select a microcontroller .

Lets say-

1. how many bit a controller should be
2. max IO pins
3. Timer, Interrupt, Serial Port
4. Speed -how can be decided .
5. Power source
6. Cost
7. Performance
8. Other require parameter

I wanted to know about all this parameters.
Its all about general fundamentals .

Hope This helps .
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,805
I Completely agree with your suggestions.
But i am still far away from my answer.

Lets i have to build up a hardware controller based circuit for my design and programming work a software engineer will do .
So now how do i select a microcontroller .

Lets say-

1. how many bit a controller should be
2. max IO pins
3. Timer, Interrupt, Serial Port
4. Speed -how can be decided .
5. Power source
6. Cost
7. Performance
8. Other require parameter

I wanted to know about all this parameters.
Its all about general fundamentals .

Hope This helps .
Answers to these questions are only relevant in the context of an application. In most cases, any chip you decide to investigate will end up having unused features. Like I said in my original post, if you don't have an application, it does not matter what selection you make. Any choice you make will have some value in that it will either meet your requirements, or will help you clarify those requirements so you can make a better choice. You should not look at this as a one shot proposition. Don't be afraid of failing to make the correct choice at the beginning of what should be a process. It is hard to see how you will ever have any regrets regardless of your initial choice.
 

KMoffett

Joined Dec 19, 2007
2,918
Your original question sounds like "I want a 'vehicle'. What should my basic selection criteria.
and i also want distinguish in terms of whether it should be '1 wheel or 2 wheels or 4 wheels or 18 wheels' ". You start by stating the application details and then ask what will work.

Ken
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,624
Start by looking at the Picmicro tutorials by Nigel Goodwin etc, which show the hardware involved and the software in Assembly of which there is the C equivalent out there on the Web.
Max.
 
Top