Hello - What is the difficulty level in soldering this IC chip to a PCB ?

Thread Starter

Lumenosity

Joined Mar 1, 2017
634
I haven't soldered anything like this.
I wish they would continue making easy to solder IC chips. Seems much of it is going to a complexity that requires robotics.
I guess they are packing so much into chips now that they are getting too complex.

Anyway...should I even attempt this soldering to a PCB ?
Thanks

FAN65004C.jpg
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
1,183
If You haven't already purchased it, and made plans for it,
and designed an SMD Circuit-Board for it,
the answer is no,
this Chip is designed for Robotic-Placement in a Mass-Production environment,
it can be done DIY, but get ready for a steep learning curve, and plenty of failures
before You have the correct Tools and experience.

There are still many quite viable "Through-Hole" chips available.
What is the overall end result that You are trying to achieve ?
.
.
.
 

jiggermole

Joined Jul 29, 2016
47
quite difficult. I don't have an oven so my soldering is done with an aluminum block and a propane torch and I have successfully soldered on similar chips. However, expect failures and several attempts. I assume I'm going to over cook at least one chip so order extras if you are going to try. As stated, its a learning curve, but not impossible. And also as stated, get a stencil when you get the board made. Using a soldering iron for this kind of chip is just not going to work. Can use a toaster oven if you have one available to do the soldering.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
3,769
I have not attempted that type of chip, which basically requires reflow, though I do use mostly SMD components now to cut down on the number of holes I have to drill.

I remember seeing a video about reflowing using an electric skillet, which looked quite easy, I even bought one at a yard sale, but have not tried it yet. I think it might have been at Sparkfun.

Bob
 

Juhahoo

Joined Jun 3, 2019
215
Concidering the size of the chip of 6x6mm, it is difficult..but.. once you order the PCB, order a paste stensile aswell so you have better chances. Use bottom heat and top heat at the same time to more evenly spread the heat. Solder first the side where this component situates, and if possible use hot plate for extra heat under the board.
 

click_here

Joined Sep 22, 2020
439
I don't know what equipment that you have, but even with the correct equipment this is going to be tricky.

I use an IR station for anything from the 'QFN' family. If you've never used anything other than a soldering iron I'd suggest that you give it a miss
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
3,463
Those pin-less packages tend to behave better than the 0.5mm pitch TQFP. Stencil, solder paste and hot air is the way to go.
Failing that, tin the pads, place the chip on top, and heat with hot air. Hot air rework tools are cheap these days, but if you have a paint stripper with temperature control and can set it to about 330°C, it will work. Surface tension should line up the chip with the pads as the solder melts.
Tinning the pads is the critical step - only practice will tell you how much to put on.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
3,463
Never tried that. How do you know when the solder has melted with all the pads covered?

Bob
Before it melts the chip looks like it is balanced precariously on a ”hill” of solder, when it melts it aligns itself with the pads and appears to be “floating”. If you prod it with the tweezers, it will move a little and then come back to rest over the padS, almost as if it is being pulled back by a spring. Not so easy to describe in words, but try It and you will see what I mean. Fortunately, leadless chips are hard to break.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
3,463
I use a toaster oven. Search for toaster oven soldering SMD. I do not do it like they say.
I use one for boards. I have added a thermocouple and a triac to regulate the temperature. Mine just happened to heat up at the rate specified in the temperature profile, so I just added the preheat plateau, and it works extremely well (apart form the smell). It fell foul of the insurance who told us that we should not be cooking food in the workshop.
 

Juhahoo

Joined Jun 3, 2019
215
These hot plates are pretty well working giving you that extra boost for heat underneath when hot air blowing top side. On small aluminium LED boards they work well too.
1632144034292.png
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
13,277
should I even attempt this soldering to a PCB ?
Failure rate for a hobbyist is going to be high. Repair will also be difficult because you'll likely need a heater from below the board melt the solder under the package. If you have a rework station, it'll be easier.
 

jiggermole

Joined Jul 29, 2016
47
These hot plates are pretty well working giving you that extra boost for heat underneath when hot air blowing top side. On small aluminium LED boards they work well too.
View attachment 248389
do you have a link for these? Kinda looking for an upgrade on my setup and aluminum led boards are something I'd like to work with and these pads seem like a good place to start.


-edit- I like how so far there have been some "its going to be really difficult" but I have yet to see a "its not possible" Not even when bgas are brought up. Kind of gives you a warm fuzzy sometimes.
 

Juhahoo

Joined Jun 3, 2019
215
do you have a link for these? Kinda looking for an upgrade on my setup and aluminum led boards are something I'd like to work with and these pads seem like a good place to start.


-edit- I like how so far there have been some "its going to be really difficult" but I have yet to see a "its not possible" Not even when bgas are brought up. Kind of gives you a warm fuzzy sometimes.
I find them from eBay, Aliexpress.. they work with AC mains power..

Everything is nearly possible, rarely something is impossible. It's just about the skill, tools and luck what you can achieve.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/3533022302...7yDAny-qPxKDvXhbkFiFOOqdRR9tD_bxoCKmUQAvD_BwE
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
2,173
I use a modified one of something like this (can't find the actual one online). Its important that it has a cast iron top for thermal stability (not an open ring or an induction hob). I replaced the crude 'temperature' control with a thermocouple epoxied into a hole in the casting from underneath and a simple home-brew temperature controller/display, though you can buy something suitable on eBay/etc. for a few $$$.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
3,463
Everything is nearly possible, rarely something is impossible. It's just about the skill, tools and luck what you can achieve.
I thought that a 48-pin TQFP would be impossible the first time I attempted it. Now I can do them with my eyes shut! (maybe I exaggerate a little)
 
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