Hello, what copper wire i need if i am using 1200v

Thread Starter

SubwoO

Joined Nov 25, 2018
3
Hello i am new in electronic can anybody help me what copper wire i need if i am using 1200v power supply ?

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spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,835
If you need to ask what kind of wire to use on a 1,200V supply then you shouldn't be messing with a 1,200V supply.

And just as important what is the amperage? If it is any more than a milli amp or so, you should not be getting anywhere near it. Get a professional.
 

Thread Starter

SubwoO

Joined Nov 25, 2018
3
Amperage is 1A i want to send 1200v pover to metal detector coil just i dont know what copper wire i need for metal detector coil, i am trying to read and learn but is very hard for now.
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
11,309
Most metal detector coils work on a much lower voltage. Why do you think you need 1200V? It is the current through the coil, and the number of turns, which determine the strength of the magnetic field generated.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
4,541
Amperage is 1A i want to send 1200v pover to metal detector coil just i dont know what copper wire i need for metal detector coil, i am trying to read and learn but is very hard for now.
HO-LEE CHIT!

OK, I can't BEGIN to think of how many issues you're facing. First, 1200 volts and 1 amp - that's 1200 watts. My wife's hair dryer on high is 1500 watts. And that's with 120 VAC. With your metal detector at that kind of power - I don't think you'd need a shovel, it's likely you'll be pulling stuff right out of the ground. Literally!

High voltage applications require wire that can withstand voltage leakage. That is to say if you use 1.2KV you need a wire capable of insulating against that high a voltage. In this case the insulation would likely be recommended to withstand 2KV (2000 volts). But I'm still scratching my head wondering why you want/need that high a voltage. The magnetic field for detecting metals at that kind of power, the coil would have to be something pulled behind a tractor. Now, if you're a farmer and want to locate pipes, I could see such a large device for locating a localized area to be followed up with one of the 9 volt battery powered metal detector they sell commercially.

With regards amperage; you don't need a heavy gauge wire. It's not the voltage that determines the size of the wire it's the amperage. 1 amp could likely be handled quite easily with a 20 gauge wire. But the insulation on that wire would have to be very thick. I'd suppose there's a website that can give you the proper information for what you ask, but I have to ask - why the heck do you need such a high voltage? I think some years back I was watching TV and some "Meteor Hunters" were using a large device constructed using PVC pipe to form a large coil on the order of 8 feet diameter (actually rectangular in shape) pulled behind an ATV. I don't know how much voltage they were using to generate their field coil power, but it would seem like an expensive AND DANGEROUS endeavor.

Everyone is going to say it - including me - be as careful as heck! One mistake is two more than you can afford.
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
TBF: high impedance voltage sources aren't all that dangerous. Planting you hand on an old CRT CTV anode cap could damage the set more than the misadventurer. The only 2kV on a MOT secondary OTOH: is pretty much guaranteed lethal with no second chances.
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,835
TBF: high impedance voltage sources aren't all that dangerous. Planting you hand on an old CRT CTV anode cap could damage the set more than the misadventurer. The only 2kV on a MOT secondary OTOH: is pretty much guaranteed lethal with no second chances.

Then you have never really gotten zapped by a high voltage anode of a crt. Checking for HV, during a late night bleary eyed repair session, I forgot to ground the ground wire to the probe. The wire swung back and touched my arm. I became the ground. The shock knocked be back against the wall and down. I was unable to see for the first 10 seconds or so.

Had I not been a fit young 15 year old, I might not be typing this right now.
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
Then you have never really gotten zapped by a high voltage anode of a crt. Checking for HV, during a late night bleary eyed repair session, I forgot to ground the ground wire to the probe. The wire swung back and touched my arm. I became the ground. The shock knocked be back against the wall and down. I was unable to see for the first 10 seconds or so.

Had I not been a fit young 15 year old, I might not be typing this right now.
The glass bowl of the CRT is the dielectric for a dirty great reservoir capacitor that can give you quite a crack - after that; the 24kV output is pretty feeble.

Arc burns are a bigger danger when that capacitor isn't turning the flyback pulses into (vaguely) DC.
 
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