Hello there! I am looking for an enthusiast who wants to partner up in a startup trying to create a sustainable solution in the gardening area!

Thread Starter

jaqueskenzo

Joined Feb 7, 2021
5
If you are interested in partnering with me and being the electrical / circuit / sensors / solar / batteries expert please send me a DM!

+ Experience in designing electrical control systems
+ Experience in setting up solar systems
+ Experience in setting up ECUs
+ Experience in setting up CPUs
+ Knowledge about volts, amps, watts, batteries, consumers, etc.
+ Knowledge about suppliers for series / mass production
+ Many mistakes made and problems solved :)

I'm at the very beginning of my journey and I look forward to meeting someone excited about going on a journey together.

LGTBQ+ | 0-118 yrs old (the oldest living person is 117,5 yrs old :)) | any planet | any continent | any country | anyone

- jaqueskenzo
 

Thread Starter

jaqueskenzo

Joined Feb 7, 2021
5
If I could sell shares in my world-changing ideas for someone else doing a lot of free work for me, I wouldn't have to work myself.

Do you have a business plan? Market survey? Show somehting.
I have a working prototype (it's a DIY model, the system is not harmonized, things work but not well, the design is good =)), I have a market / competition analysis, I have a product feature comparison and I have positive feedback from family & friends. It's not a lot, but it's sth! I'm getting there; for a business plan I do need more knowledge and insights into specifics and cost of parts (electrical, plastics, solar, etc.), not there yet. That's where I need help / partners!

Best
- jk
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,086
I suppose it might be helpful if you could make a business case for what you are doing.
My own observations on gardening are that is a great deal of work to produce more food than you can consume in the short harvest season and you end up giving most of it away.
I think this one is a hard pass.
 
While a robotic gardener is pretty impressive many people who have a garden simply do it for the joy of gardening. It could be good for people who are constantly on the move and don't have time, but in the end someone still has to check in on things now and again for bugs, fungus, and whatever pests are common to the area.

My own observations on gardening are that is a great deal of work to produce more food than you can consume in the short harvest season and you end up giving most of it away.
There is always canning and freezing... another great deal of work, but you end up keeping more than you give away.

In a nutshell I don't believe there is enough of a market for such a device to make it worth getting in to. I won't spend the money on a machine to do something I can take care of myself in an hour or so a couple days a week. Since the deer always seemed to find my sweet corn, and rabbits find everything else they like I would be worried they would damage any device installed. Besides all that you will still have to prepare the ground, and harvest by hand. I could be wrong...

Another thought... right now where I am we are in the middle of cold temperatures for the area (10F at the moment), a blanket of snow on the ground, and no relief for a week or so. The temperature isn't the real problem. It's the snow that melts, gets into tiny cracks, refreezes and expands, and pushes things apart that causes the biggest problems. I'd either have to cover it all somehow or dismantle and find storage... neither of which I would care to spend time doing.

I actually like the idea, but just don't think it would be practical for me or most people I know who garden.

I do realize I made an assumption as to the final product and could be totally off.
 
Last edited:

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,086
While a robotic gardener is pretty impressive many people who have a garden simply do it for the joy of gardening. It could be good for people who are constantly on the move and don't have time, but in the end someone still has to check in on things now and again for bugs, fungus, and whatever pests are common to the area.



There is always canning and freezing... another great deal of work, but you end up keeping more than you give away.

In a nutshell I don't believe there is enough of a market for such a device to make it worth getting in to. I won't spend the money on a machine to do something I can take care of myself in an hour or so a couple days a week. Since the deer always seemed to find my sweet corn, and rabbits find everything else they like I would be worried they would damage any device installed. Besides all that you will still have to prepare the ground, and harvest by hand. I could be wrong...

Another thought... right now where I am we are in the middle of cold temperatures for the area (10F at the moment), a blanket of snow on the ground, and no relief for a week or so. The temperature isn't the real problem. It's the snow that melts, gets into tiny cracks, refreezes and expands, and pushes things apart that causes the biggest problems. I'd either have to cover it all somehow or dismantle and find storage... neither of which I would care to spend time doing.

I actually like the idea, but just don't think it would be practical for me or most people I know who garden.

I do realize I made an assumption as to the final product and could be totally off.
This is precisely why an entrepreneur will throw ideas into a crucible. To avoid the agony of slow stupid failure in trying to pursue a goal that cannot be met. The sad truth of the venture capital game is that 1 in 10 enterprises will succeed, another will break even, and the rest will go down in flames. Expressing an opinion about a business idea is not personal it is designed to help the entrepreneur to flesh out and think through the plan so that if he does decide to go through with it he at least has both eyes wide open. This is perhaps the most valuable free service on the planet.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,152
I'd like to hear the basic value proposition: what problem(s) it solves for the customer, the features and benefits, and the target price area. A lot of gardeners might try a $30 toy. Very few will spend $1,000, but even that tiny niche could be attractive if you have a product that appeals to them.
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
7,418
Let's remember this young person is starting their career and a little encouragement from more experienced people will go a long way in helping them. They have turned to a powerful resource so let's see how we can help rather than casting doubt.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,086
Let's remember this young person is starting their career and a little encouragement from more experienced people will go a long way in helping them. They have turned to a powerful resource so let's see how we can help rather than casting doubt.
The successful entrepreneur will have more than a single idea. The trick is to quickly get to the first one without wasting time and resources. Throwing cold water on ideas that are indefensible is really the best possible favor we could do. I assure you, the world of finance and venture capital is far harsher than we could ever be.
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
12,060
a little encouragement from more experienced people will go a long way in helping them
That's certainly true, but pointing out defects in a proposed project is also helpful in avoiding a lot of wasted time, frustration and expense. Entrepreneurs have to learn to overcome disappointments and accept the realities of the commercial world.
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
8,558
That's certainly true, but pointing out defects in a proposed project is also helpful in avoiding a lot of wasted time, frustration and expense.
Try doing that to someone who is trying to defeat all known electronic and normal physics. They seem to think they are on to something earth shattering.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,152
Try doing that to someone who is trying to defeat all known electronic and normal physics. They seem to think they are on to something earth shattering.
Yup, I was going to mention that the no-over-unity policy of this site is the opposite of encouragement. It actively discourages wasting time on the impossible. I'm all for that in other topics as well.

But this topic isn't that. We haven't heard enough about the vision to judge one way or the other. What we can judge is that doing a buttload of work for free doesn't sound attractive without a lot more detail.
 
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