Future in electronics.........

Thread Starter

Motanache

Joined Mar 2, 2015
481
In college, I guess the digital will cover a lot of electronics.And I was not mistaken.
Audio cassettes have disappeared and much of the audio part of the phones we listen to is digital.

Now I ask myself and I ask you what do you think it will follow in future?


I would say that digital processing with analogical appearance.

Why do I ask?
I want to build an audio amplifier with tone corrector.
To do this with a micro controller with an analogical potentiometer.It's just an idea ....
 

Thread Starter

Motanache

Joined Mar 2, 2015
481
Some programmers believe the software will be the future.........

Why should I do hardware design? With a 6 " color LCD camera and internet connection.
I can get an older phone and write a program on Android.


Another idea:
It seemed like the PC processor frequency would increase continuously. That's how we understood the evolution.
Now there reach a limit......
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,012
Some programmers believe the software will be the future.........

Why should I do hardware design? With a 6 " color LCD camera and internet connection.
I can get an older phone and write a program on Android.


Another idea:
It seemed like the PC processor frequency would increase continuously. That's how we understood the evolution.
Now there reach a limit......
So you seem to be more of an academic that wants to research why you are not successful rather than do work to become successful.
Put together a resume, spit together a portfolio of projects on a site like Seelio.com, set up a LinkedIn.com account with your resume, and build a network of friends, family, professional connections, have many people read and help improve your resume, etc

Also, start offering your services on places like freelancer.com.

I know some kids that managed to do work in programming and electronics since they were 15, you should be able to find something. Guitar amp repair, website development, art projects, product development, they are all out there.
 

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,568
Some programmers believe the software will be the future.........
Why should I do hardware design? With a 6 " color LCD camera and internet connection.
I can get an older phone and write a program on Android...
That is the problem !

Doing the easy things... Massaging a smart phone with one hand and scratching your 'tonsills' with the other, self convinced it will make a lot of money in a week and success from a couch avoiding hard work.

Older people grew up as kids repairing a motorcycle, building aircraft models, transceivers, chemistry sets and many other hard tasks.
The "Nintendo generation" never touches grease or burn fingers.

All of that is left now to the chinese that build the robots you complain as taking your job opportunities. If you think that robotics software can be written that comfortably, keep playing Nintendo and good luck.

Ideas are not worth a penny. Finished working sold products are worthy.
 
Last edited:

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
26,398
Some programmers believe the software will be the future.........

Why should I do hardware design? With a 6 " color LCD camera and internet connection.
I can get an older phone and write a program on Android.


Another idea:
It seemed like the PC processor frequency would increase continuously. That's how we understood the evolution.
Now there reach a limit......
No, that's only how you MISunderstood the evolution. Processor frequency is not equivalent to processing capacity. Even as processor speeds saturated (and frequently came down), the processing power continued to grow -- it's just that a lot more processing gets accomplished with every clock cycle.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,426
Some programmers believe the software will be the future.........
So who will design the hardware they program?

I'm biased, but I think software is a lot easier than hardware. I've done both and spent most of my career writing software to check design rules in microprocessors, synthesize layout, and analyze data for yield problems, but only had formal training for electronics. Took a few programming classes in high school and college, but the rest was pretty much on the job and technical training (e.g. 1 week language course). I learned about the Unix kernel by reading books. Don't think I could have learned electrical engineering that way.
 

bogosort

Joined Sep 24, 2011
596
I'm biased, but I think software is a lot easier than hardware. I've done both and spent most of my career writing software to check design rules in microprocessors, synthesize layout, and analyze data for yield problems, but only had formal training for electronics. Took a few programming classes in high school and college, but the rest was pretty much on the job and technical training (e.g. 1 week language course). I learned about the Unix kernel by reading books. Don't think I could have learned electrical engineering that way.
To be fair, reading books about a Unix kernel doesn't mean you can actually write one, just like reading books about a pipelined superscalar CPU doesn't mean I can actually design one.

While I'd agree that hardware design has a much steeper learning curve, I think software design is ultimately harder because software has unbounded complexity. It's relatively easy to write simple programs, or write more ambitious software badly. But writing good software is enormously difficult once a program's complexity increases beyond some threshold. At least from my perspective (hardware/software for industrial applications), hardware complexity is easier to manage -- large circuits are effectively treated as interconnected blocks of simpler circuits, which can be iterated down to the individual ICs. That abstraction doesn't hold up with software; there's too much coupling between all the parts, sometimes due to bad design decisions (because good software design is really hard!), but mainly due to the nature of software as state machines.

Looking at it from the reverse perspective: hardware is generally easier to troubleshoot than (sufficiently complex) software. I've spent literally weeks untangling a subtle race condition in a highly threaded program, whereas with hardware, as long as I have the right equipment, I'm confident I can pinpoint the problem within a day, and usually much quicker than that.

Computer hardware is highly complex, but a modern OS is far more complex -- and so more difficult to get right -- than the hardware it runs on.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
26,398
I think both hardware and software track pretty much in parallel in terms of difficulty and complexity -- and the need for good design practices and the susceptibility to poor design practices.

Different people, not surprisingly, tend to be better (i.e., more comfortable/proficient) at one than the other and, partly as a consequence, they tend work at a higher level of difficulty and lower level of abstraction in one than the other. For instance, an IC designer that also writes a fair amount of code is likely to write code at a much simpler level than they design ICs at -- and of course the reverse can be the case in that the level at which someone that is a hardcore programmer works with hardware at tends to be at a much higher level of abstraction. Hence it is easy for people to recognize the difficulties and complexities of the area they are intimately familiar with while often being blissfully unaware of the difficulties and complexities on the other side of the fence.
 
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