Divided by a Common Language

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by studiot, May 7, 2015.

  1. studiot

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    For those who might like to enjoy the difference between US and UK stuff

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    Who's smarter?

     
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  2. atferrari

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    Jan 6, 2004
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    Hola studiot, I think this could be somehow in line with your OP. Sorry if not.

    Just to confirm what I recall from my years at sea and very few recent voyages, could anyone in UK, Australia and USA, post a .wav (or whatever, but not mp4) file for me to hear how a native pronounces the following in bold:?

    Gateacre Brow (street in Liverpool - UK)
    Gateacre (suburb in Liverpool - UK)
    Charleston (US East Coast)
    Newport News (US East Coast)
    newspapers (yes, the printed thing)
    Houston( Gulf of Mexico)

    Please do not try to be nice; just say it as you would say it, talking to a friend.

    BTW, my friend (British, born and living in Liverpool), I understand what she says in a 99,999% but the (native) taxi driver that brought me to her home last year, spoke what I think, was a different language. :confused: I understood maybe a 00,001 % of what he said. :eek: (He was talking about our (soccer) players in Europe). Good to note that luckily, he understood my explanation on how to reach her place (¡Gracias Street View!!) ;)

    Gracias.
     
  3. tom_s

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    Jun 27, 2014
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    down under traditionally british

    the taxi industry here only seem to speak turban
     
  4. MaxHeadRoom

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    Jul 18, 2013
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    Just a few comments from someone born and raised in UK but now living in N.A. On the subject of word origin, many in the UK may think that the American use of Fall instead of Autumn is an Americanism, Fall is one of the few old English words that remained, and the UK changed it to Autumn.
    The thing I had to get used to before the metrication in Canada was the use of both Imperial and U.S. means of measure.
    If I purchased a gal of cooking oil, the gallon was U.S. whereas if I bought a gal of gas it was Imperial, Canadians as a whole do not know even know now what a pint of beer should be, most think it is 16oz (US) instead of 20oz (Imp).:eek:
    Max.
     
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  5. Rolland B. Heiss

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    Feb 4, 2015
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    Your comment caused my mind to 'Fall' into 'Autumn' melodically ;):

     
  6. tcmtech

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    ANd then theres the scottish as Robin williams does it. :D

     
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  7. cmartinez

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    Very, very interesting stuff... my being bilingual has given me a unique perspective on the differences between English and... well... American :D ... It's hilarious to me sometimes, and lots of people don't get why I find this sort of thing funny ... I'll laugh all the same with "Monty Python" as with "How I Met Your Mother" sense of humor
     
  8. wayneh

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    Sep 9, 2010
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    Siri says all of these as I would (Chicago area, northern Illinois) except for Gateacre, where I would use a long A on the "gate" part, but she seems to use "gat" instead.
     
  9. atferrari

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    Sorry wayneh, but (non-native here) could you post an audio sample?
     
  10. wayneh

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    The results you get at online text-to-speech tools (here, here, here) are all the same and all correct except for Gateacre. I would say this as if it was two words - gate acre. Those online tools produce that result if you add the space.
     
  11. ErnieM

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    Houston: is that the city in Texas or the street in New York City?
     
  12. atferrari

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    The city Ernie
     
  13. djsfantasi

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    Note being familiar with Gateacre, I would pronounce it gat - ay ckr.
     
  14. wayneh

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    Why not a long A in gate?
     
  15. Wendy

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    When I was a kid my Dad was stationed at Lakenheath Air Force Base in Great Britain. We lived a while off base. Brits have some of the most delicious cookies on earth, but they don't call them that. My Mom wanted some from the milk man (they delivered back then), he didn't have a clue what she was asking for until the light bulb went off. "Oh, you want some biscuits!"
     
  16. atferrari

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    A simple solution. Gracias Wayne.

    I have always been intrigued why everybody pronounces the particle "ou" in "Houston" so differently as you do in, for example, "noun", "mould", "bound".
     
  17. atferrari

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    My friend there, who lives very close to that street, corrected me and said something like "Geetaker". Hope it conveys what I actually heard from her.
     
  18. studiot

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    If you reverse the vowels it gets even more interesting.

    'buoy' in american and english.
     
  19. djsfantasi

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    I pronounce 'buoy' like "boo - ee"

    The Forum does not allow uploading wav files; remove the txt extension from the attached file.
     
  20. atferrari

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    How do you pronounce it, studiot?
     
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