DC to DC Boost Converter - 12V to 96V at >9 amps

Thread Starter

danielb33

Joined Aug 20, 2012
105
Lol brownout, convince anyone of what? That I did the design, and that is the application? You tickle me! : ) Connect with me on linkedin!
tcmtech - you are right linear actuators are much less efficient and push almost always push lower loads. The problem with Impacs current EZ Lift systems is the mess they make, and the position control. I don't understand the mechanics, but they use a "natural" position control, using fluid. But still, during un-even loads the actuators see a 6" difference in position from shaft to shaft at full stroke! Our systems implements the same system (we have a slightly lower maximum load) but we can control position accurately, avoid the mess, and at a lower cost.

But you are wrong about selling point, and I would have to say you know nothing about it, as the CEO of the company is having Power Engineering & Manufacturing design the systems and is paying a high price for us to do it. The fact is no one here gets why.

I will ask the Mechanical team about efficiency, I have been taking orders from them regarding voltage and efficiency. I just design the controls. I'll let them educate you when I here back.

Some of the extremely high load systems will have to remain hydraulic.
 

Brownout

Joined Jan 10, 2012
2,390
For a different perspective, here is some info regarding using electric linear actuators in applications previously powered by hydraulics.

Highlights:

The myth that hydraulic actuators are more reliable may also be due to the fact that many
engineers are familiar with a previous generation of electric linear actuators that often did
experience reliability problems. But electric linear actuators have benefited from dramatically
improved reliability of all electronic and electrical products. Consisting solely of a motor,
gearbox, lead or ball screw and often a clutch, electric linear actuators are also much simpler
than their hydraulic counterparts. Compare this to hydraulic systems that have many more
components such as a reservoir, pump, DC motor, motor relay, solenoid valve, check valve,
hydraulic cylinder, and push-button station. Based on highly reliable electronic technology and
with minimized possible points of failure, the reliability of electric linear actuators has improved
in recent years to the point that in the vast majority of applications they will outlive the
equipment they are installed on.
http://www.thomsonlinear.com/downloads/articles/Debunking_the_Myths_of_Hydraulic_to_Electric_Actuator_Conversion_taen.pdf
http://www.markeymachinery.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Article-Electric-Hydraulic.pdf
http://machinedesign.com/archive/electric-actuators-push-hydraulics-out-highway-equipment
 

Brownout

Joined Jan 10, 2012
2,390
Lol brownout, convince anyone of what? That I did the design, and that is the application?
Nope. Nobody believes you didn't design it.

you are right linear actuators are much less efficient
Eliminating the pump, hoses, etc can make a linear actuator 25-30% more efficient than a comparable hydraulic system. .
 
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Brownout

Joined Jan 10, 2012
2,390
I didn't think anyone made one this big - but they do. I'm not sure it will start your motor, but you could ask.

http://www.secamerica.com/products/converters/6948.php
To support my earlier remarks about weight, this 1200 Watt converter weighs only 15 lb. Actually, I'm glad you posted that because some of the applications listed on the page are some of the same ones I've been thinking about for such a component.
 

ronv

Joined Nov 12, 2008
3,770
I haven't been able to get a price from them yet, but I'm guessing $1500. Only 30 amp surge so it may not start a 1 hp motor under load.
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,868
The problem with Impacs current EZ Lift systems is the mess they make, and the position control. I don't understand the mechanics, but they use a "natural" position control, using fluid. But still, during un-even loads the actuators see a 6" difference in position from shaft to shaft at full stroke!
By adding a simple rotary type fluid divider device between the pump and the two cylinders a repeatable synchronization regardless of load not an issue.

Price for a small two circuit divider would be around $100 - $150 and give you a +- 1/8" or less variation between each cylinder even at 100% power on one and zero load on the other.

Pretty simple and common hydraulics system tech to be honest. :oops:
 
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