Cleaning blower on 15 year old portable evaporative cooler

Thread Starter

drbuck187

Joined Aug 15, 2019
4
Hello!!
Well, the pics are blurry, but you get the idea. I have an about 15 year old portable evaporative cooler that has been doing it's job (with like every six month cleaning) great!! But now, because I think the blower motor is dirty. The system cooler fan speeds will now vary as it seems to sense the blower is slowing down, speeds it self up, then it's going to fast so it slows down, then repeats. When I rotate the assembly by hand, it seems resistant and 'bogged down'. Motors need lubrication, even those that are 'sealed' or something to protect moving parts, on SOME BLOWERS.
Well I disassembled the unit as far as the pics. I vacuumed everywhere out then wiped down with a damp rag, just cause. I spun the blower while I vacuumed, but it didn't seem to help; blower is still noticeably resistant. I don't want to disassemble it any more without asking some people that may have experience with this, THANKS!!!!!

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Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
4,518
Some blowers use ball bearings and some just a simple brass bushing. Over years of service depending on their environment they get gunked up or less expensive solutions like brass bushings wear. If you can get it down to where you can see whatever supports the shaft you can try and lubricate things with either a light grease like a white lithium grease or some light machine oil. This just depends on the motor type and how deep you can get into it. Sealed motors while not designed to be disassembled can often be taken down enough to lubricate them.

Just guessing by the number of wires going into the motor in your pictures it looks to be a variable speed motor but if you feel above normal resistance when rotating the shaft the odds are whatever bearings it uses or bushings are gunked up. Try and get a few drops of good machine oil in them.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

drbuck187

Joined Aug 15, 2019
4
Some blowers use ball bearings and some just a simple brass bushing. Over years of service depending on their environment they get gunked up or less expensive solutions like brass bushings wear. If you can get it down to where you can see whatever supports the shaft you can try and lubricate things with either a light grease like a white lithium grease or some light machine oil. This just depends on the motor type and how deep you can get into it. Sealed motors while not designed to be disassembled can often be taken down enough to lubricate them.

Just guessing by the number of wires going into the motor in your pictures it looks to be a variable speed motor but if you feel above normal resistance when rotating the shaft the odds are whatever bearings it uses or bushings are gunked up. Try and get a few drops of good machine oil in them.

Ron
THANKS!!
I was hoping that's all it needed is some lube, and disassembled as it is, hoping to take off one or two metal motor assembly parts/4-8 screws to get where it needs to be cleaned/lubed. What do you think? :)
 

Lo_volt

Joined Apr 3, 2014
80
I've refurbed fan blower motors with bronze bushings by soaking them in medium grade oil. SAE 30 or the like. WD-40 is too light and will dry out too quickly. The bronze is porous oil is absorbed into it when it is manufactured. Over time the oil dries out. Oilite is one manufacturer of these bearings.
I'll turn the motor so the bearing is up and drip a few drops of oil along the shaft down into the bearing. Usually the bearing is recessed from the face of the motor. This helps because you can pool some oil there. I leave the oil to soak over night. Before re-installing the motor I soak up the excess oil with a cotton swab or a paper towel so it doesn't drip into the works.
Looking at your pictures, you'd have to disassemble the motor to get to the rear bushing.

This doesn't last forever. It might last you 6 months to a year but it's worth a try, especially since you service the unit every 6 months anyway.
 

Thread Starter

drbuck187

Joined Aug 15, 2019
4
OK, THANKS!! I think I have to take more apart (pics showing the disassembly help in the assembly!! I have to take more picks of where different sized screws go in where and other stuff!!) Well a lot more work (I'll hopefully do soon...)!! :)


I've refurbed fan blower motors with bronze bushings by soaking them in medium grade oil. SAE 30 or the like. WD-40 is too light and will dry out too quickly. The bronze is porous oil is absorbed into it when it is manufactured. Over time the oil dries out. Oilite is one manufacturer of these bearings.
I'll turn the motor so the bearing is up and drip a few drops of oil along the shaft down into the bearing. Usually the bearing is recessed from the face of the motor. This helps because you can pool some oil there. I leave the oil to soak over night. Before re-installing the motor I soak up the excess oil with a cotton swab or a paper towel so it doesn't drip into the works.
Looking at your pictures, you'd have to disassemble the motor to get to the rear bushing.

This doesn't last forever. It might last you 6 months to a year but it's worth a try, especially since you service the unit every 6 months anyway.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
5,621
I’ve refurbished many fans with bronze bushings. In fact, I have never bought a fan. After the hot summer months, people discard fans by the dozens because they think they’re broken.

They’re not.

The secret to refurbish the fan motor is that simply adding lube or oil isn’t sufficient.

I start with a lot of rags and WD40. I flood the bushing and soak u the excess fluid. Then I make a second pass with acetone. Similar process... Most fan bodies are not affected by acetone, but check.

Now you’ve flushed the old lube and varnish from the bearing. It’s pretty dry. So you have to replace the lube.

Flush the bearing with plenty of 10W40. Use the rag technique to avoid a mess. Hand turn the axle and wipe again. Repeatedly until there is no excess.

The secret is that the WD40 and acetone flushes cleans out the varnish from burnt lube. And flooding with lubricant ensures that the bearing is fully lubricated. And the rags ensure that you don’t overlubricate. My philosophy is over do and back off.
 

Thread Starter

drbuck187

Joined Aug 15, 2019
4
I’ve refurbished many fans with bronze bushings. In fact, I have never bought a fan. After the hot summer months, people discard fans by the dozens because they think they’re broken.

They’re not.

The secret to refurbish the fan motor is that simply adding lube or oil isn’t sufficient.

I start with a lot of rags and WD40. I flood the bushing and soak u the excess fluid. Then I make a second pass with acetone. Similar process... Most fan bodies are not affected by acetone, but check.

Now you’ve flushed the old lube and varnish from the bearing. It’s pretty dry. So you have to replace the lube.

Flush the bearing with plenty of 10W40. Use the rag technique to avoid a mess. Hand turn the axle and wipe again. Repeatedly until there is no excess.

The secret is that the WD40 and acetone flushes cleans out the varnish from burnt lube. And flooding with lubricant ensures that the bearing is fully lubricated. And the rags ensure that you don’t overlubricate. My philosophy is over do and back off.
This is all GREAT ADVICE (and there are other great replies too ;) )and things for me to do; THANK YOU GUYS!!!!
 
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