Changing voltage with a changing frequency

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
901
as others have said, yes
but it would be good to know what sort of frequency range and voltage range in you need.

After all, frequency to voltage is what an FM radio does,
( ok the change in frequency gives the change in voltage ) ,,,

Alternatively, hard limiting a sine wave of variable frequency to a square wave, and then low pass filtering the output will give you a varying output voltage as the input frequency changes.
 

Thread Starter

E_enthusiast

Joined Aug 20, 2020
25
as others have said, yes
but it would be good to know what sort of frequency range and voltage range in you need.

After all, frequency to voltage is what an FM radio does,
( ok the change in frequency gives the change in voltage ) ,,,

Alternatively, hard limiting a sine wave of variable frequency to a square wave, and then low pass filtering the output will give you a varying output voltage as the input frequency changes.
Well if you could help me it would be awesome, the lowest frequency can be as low as 5 hertz... And the highest frequency can be 5kHz.. and the voltage varies from 0 to 5 volt.. do you think it is possible? Because as far as I know it's practically impossible
 

OBW0549

Joined Mar 2, 2015
3,566
Alternatively, hard limiting a sine wave of variable frequency to a square wave, and then low pass filtering the output will give you a varying output voltage as the input frequency changes.
By itself, that won't give you a frequency-dependent output voltage. But if you take the square wave and use it to trigger a monostable multivibrator, and then low-pass filter the multivibrator's output, that would do the trick.

EDIT: Lots of frequency to voltage converter circuits, here.
 
Last edited:

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
901
By itself, that won't give you a frequency-dependent output voltage. But if you take the square wave and use it to trigger a monostable multivibrator, and then low-pass filter the multivibrator's output, that would do the trick.

EDIT: Lots of frequency to voltage converter circuits, here.

OOPs ,

your right, put it down to snr moment,
yep dont just hard limit and get the DC !!!
 
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