Capacitor value identification

Thread Starter

bexar

Joined Feb 18, 2022
3
I have attached a photo of an electric fence charger output transformer secondary filtering capacitor array. The array is made up of 16 caps (well at least I think they are caps!). Also in the photo part of the output transformer is visible and a few of the fence connection posts.

The markings on the caps are difficult to see, this is the marking: 510v
594BC
0023

Can anyone tell me the value of the cap and break down voltage?

Thank youIMG_2061.JPG
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
17,791
I have never seen a capacitive fiter on the output of a fence charger. that would totally defeat the purpose of delivering a stinging shock. And that circuit board, what little of it shows, does not look like a common electric fence charger.
Is this one of the super-spark fence chargers made for horse corral application??
Those devices do also resemble MOVs, which would be included for lightning protection. I am aware of at least one nasty storm with lots of lightning took out fence chargers for several miles. It burned out the high voltage secondary of the pulse transformers.
 

Thread Starter

bexar

Joined Feb 18, 2022
3
I want to thank MrChips and MisterBill2 for their helpful inputs. I can assure MisterBill2 that this is an electric fence charger. It is a Daken Model 35 made in Australia and charging my fences for the last twenty years or so. I'm somewhat a dinosaur in electronics. Was in the game from early 1960's to 2010 when I retired as a Tech Rep for Texas Instruments supporting airborne radar. The fence charger stopped working a few weeks ago and decided to get back in the game! So I have some catching up to do! Starting with MOVs. Again, thank you for your helpful inputs.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
17,791
Usually a fence charger has a rectifier part, followed by an energy storage section that tends to look a lot like a filter, folloed by a fast switch segment driven by a pulse timer which drives the switch. The switch usually dumps the charge into the step up transformer. Usually, but not always, fairly simple and assembled compactly. That was the puzzle as the PCB shown was not all the parts assembled in the smallest possible space.
 
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