Capacitor specifications, theoretical

Thread Starter

mistachy

Joined Oct 27, 2018
2
Need to come up with specifications for a capacitor that can hold 20,000 or more amps
How many joules or watts or how much energy can this theoretical capacitor hold
how many farads, what would the current be and how many volts could it tolerate, how to increase volt tolerance. how to increase charge rate, decrease charge time?

how much surface area would be needed for the electrodes, thinking of hafnium as a electrode and thinking of teflon as a insulator since it has a dielectric strength of 60x10^6, but it melts around 650 degrees. is there something else with a high dielectric strength but higher melting point? any input on these questions is greatly appreciated
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,250
Need to come up with specifications for a capacitor that can hold 20,000 or more amps
How many joules or watts or how much energy can this theoretical capacitor hold
how many farads, what would the current be and how many volts could it tolerate, how to increase volt tolerance. how to increase charge rate, decrease charge time?

how much surface area would be needed for the electrodes, thinking of hafnium as a electrode and thinking of teflon as a insulator since it has a dielectric strength of 60x10^6, but it melts around 650 degrees. is there something else with a high dielectric strength but higher melting point? any input on these questions is greatly appreciated
Your questions start of with a nonsensical one. Capacitors don't hold amps. This is like asking how big a gas tank has to be in order to go 200 mph.

You might take a step back and first learn what a capacitor is and what it does and how it does it.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,250
If anyone can answer any of the questions, that will be greatly appreciated
All of your questions except the last one are based on the answer to the first one and it has no answer because it is completely nonsensical.

The last one, regarding dielectric strength, is unanswerable because you don't bother to give the units on your dielectric strength. This is like asking if anyone knows where you can get steel pipe that is more than 8 long.

But if you want a high dielectric strength material that has a high melting point, try fused silica.
 
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