Can you become an engineer if you hated physics in gymnasium/highschool?

Thread Starter

wolly

Joined Jul 11, 2018
25
I joined college in the navy with the specialty electrotehnics but I am not certain if this is what I want in life.I want to travel the world and this is the reason why I choosed this profession.My teachers in gymnasium were interested in bribes and prizes from the olympic events and they didn't care about me,For them,education was more of a profit condition and those who were good at math,physics or chemistry were congratulated in the classroom while those who weren't......they were mocked.I wasn't lucky in life to be guided in a field/domain and this is how I spent 12 years of my life for a qualification which doesn't worth a penny....
The level of this specialty is at a lower level of electrical engineering and most of the courses are easy if you can understand a few concepts of algebra and geometry.The physics from what I have seen is at a highschool level(things like F=ma,a=Δv/Δt,v=Δx/Δt,F=kqQ/r^2).
My question is:,,Can you restart everything you skipped learning during gymnasium/highschool and relearn them in college''?
I already wasted most of my time with homeworks and lessons and I don't want to spend 4 more years for a degree which won't help me a lot.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
9,962
I assume you're talking about electrical engineering. You take a lot more math than physics and use little of either in actual practice.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
12,862
I think you're hosed. Knowledge of how the physical world works is pretty fundamental. It may be possible, but there will always be that hint of self doubt when you're making a pitch to people who know more than you do. Why not pick a field where that won't be a problem.
 

Thread Starter

wolly

Joined Jul 11, 2018
25
I forgot to mention the fact that I memorised a few formulas in physics and I couldn't understand how they act in the real world.
The only part that saves me is the laboratory given by the university.
 

Thread Starter

wolly

Joined Jul 11, 2018
25
Why not pick a field where that won't be a problem.
And that would be....? I have no idea what to pick. I was good at math(both algebra and trigonometry) but now these formulas are quite useless.
What can you do with math? Become a math teacher? I hate kids/adults and I have no interest to help someone that probably hates me or doesn't give two pennies about me...
There is also programming but that is not going to be a great choice because I hate writing 100 lines of code and in this specialty you don't have to write that long. I've seen the commands and they don't exceed 10 or 20 lines.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
12,862
As I see it you're trying to get a lukewarm seal of approval to become a 2/3 of an engineer. Good at some things and not so much at others. Why do you even care what we think? I'm trying to say that I would rather have you doing something you enjoy that doesn't cause you a high level of stress. If you decide to pursue engineering, it will lead to a situation of manifest unhappiness and disdain from you employers and coworkers. Save yourself the aggravation and choose something else that only you can choose. I am in no position to advise you on this point.

Think of it like becoming a Navy Seal. You either persevere, outlast, and overcome the obstacles in front of you or you ring out.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,711
And that would be....? I have no idea what to pick. I was good at math(both algebra and trigonometry) but now these formulas are quite useless.
What can you do with math? Become a math teacher? I hate kids/adults and I have no interest to help someone that probably hates me or doesn't give two pennies about me...
There is also programming but that is not going to be a great choice because I hate writing 100 lines of code and in this specialty you don't have to write that long. I've seen the commands and they don't exceed 10 or 20 lines.
I don't think your problem is physics or lack thereof. That attitude (underlined) will probably be a problem in any job. Have you considered entrepreneurship and managing your own hedge fund?
 

Thread Starter

wolly

Joined Jul 11, 2018
25
I don't think your problem is physics or lack thereof. That attitude (underlined) will probably be a problem in any job. Have you considered entrepreneurship and managing your own hedge fund?
To be an entrepeneur you need money and I don't have a lot of money.I guess that if you work as an electrician cadet for a while you can promote to a Electro-technical-officer and enjoy the sightseeing.
 

Thread Starter

wolly

Joined Jul 11, 2018
25
What is a "Gymnasium/High School"?

it sounds like applying the physics to football or basketball. o_O
4 years, starting at age 10 ends with Diploma de Capacitate at the age of 14. Primary education lasts for four years. Secondary education consists in: 1) lower secondary school education organized in Gymnasium for grades 5 to 8 and lower cycle of high school or arts and trades schools (vocational) for grades 9 and 10; 2) upper secondary school education organized in Ciclul superior al liceului for grades 11, 12 and 13 followed, if necessary, by an additional high school year for those who want to move from vocational training (grade 10) to upper secondary school education. High school education (lower cycle of high school and upper secondary school education) offers three different orientations (academic, technological, specialization).
I also forgot to mention the fact that my teachers in gymnasium(5-8 class) didn't offered me the degree for graduating gymnasium and I don't know if I will need it in the future but I do have my highschool degree(9-12 class).
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
9,962
In extremely exceptional cases, you can be a good electrical engineer without formal education (e.g. Jim Williams dropped out after one term of college). But, there aren't many people in that category and most companies use college degrees as filters. If you don't already have relevant work experience, most companies wouldn't even bother with a phone screen.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
20,175
Sounds like you got a bad deal in school.

A lot of what you excel at in early school is very much dependent on the type of schooling you receive, i.e. the teachers that taught you.
Perhaps you need to put that history behind you and move forward.

Ask yourself what really interests you, what motivates you, not what you want to become.
Follow your dreams and passion. Once you have found your calling, pursue that, regardless of how many years it takes.

Good luck moving forward.
 

Thread Starter

wolly

Joined Jul 11, 2018
25
Sounds like you got a bad deal in school.

A lot of what you excel at in early school is very much dependent on the type of schooling you receive, i.e. the teachers that taught you.
Perhaps you need to put that history behind you and move forward.

Ask yourself what really interests you, what motivates you, not what you want to become.
Follow your dreams and passion. Once you have found your calling, pursue that, regardless of how many years it takes.

Good luck moving forward.
So that means engineering is not meant for me and I should pick something else?
 

Thread Starter

wolly

Joined Jul 11, 2018
25
In extremely exceptional cases, you can be a good electrical engineer without formal education (e.g. Jim Williams dropped out after one term of college). But, there aren't many people in that category and most companies use college degrees as filters. If you don't already have relevant work experience, most companies wouldn't even bother with a phone screen.
I also forgot to mention that I will have an exploitation engineering degree and not projection.That would only help me to work in ships as an electrician assistant or electrician cadet but it will be harder to promote because I have no experience in that field.The voyage will take 6 months and to be honest that is the only experience I have.Mathematically,that would take 12 months to become an engineer/ETO(Electro-Technical-Officer) and that is 1 year spent in the ships.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,888
So that means engineering is not meant for me and I should pick something else?
IMO most of us had an engineering 'knack' early in life. It didn't mean not working hard to understand the foundations of physics in engineering so you can see the root of problems, in fact it made us work harder at the things we loved. If you're willing to put in the work it's possible but if you hate it then look for something else because even with the 'knack' it's a lot of hard work.

 
Can you become an engineer if you hated physics in gymnasium/highschool?
A wholly general response:

***Barring a favorable shift in your attitude toward physical science and mathematics***
In a 'perfect world' No! -- As a practical (i.e. 'real world') matter -for the sake of all concerned (including yourself)-- you shouldn't! --- But again, it's your present attitude toward/esteem of said subjects that 'counts'!:cool:

Best regards and good luck with genuinely desired pursuits!
HP:)
 
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