Building Block Circuits

Thread Starter

jacaylor

Joined Nov 2, 2020
6
Hi all, I am looking for a place where I could find like schematics of different types of general circuits. Like building block circuits. For example, this would include things like filters, transistor amplifier classes, rectifiers, tone control stages, adders, etc. I want to get a general idea of waveform mapping through different circuits so that I can work on my wave shaping. Also, I would hope to compile like a list or something of the sort.

Thanks,
Josh

--Note: I do know of places like "circuit finder", "all schematics" and things like that.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
18,978
I can give you a zip file with LTspice simulations of approximately 1200 circuits, that I have developed and collected. You get a fair number of additional circuits from the LTspice download. It's enough to keep you occupied for months on end.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,697
One website that includes quite a bit of that is "Schematics for free.com" and if you do a search for that some others pop up as well. Also lots of circuits of complete products, where one would need to decide what portion they want to copy.
So yes, circuits are freely available but not ina "ccokbook" sort of format. Which I consider just as well. A bit of mental exercise is a good thing, figuring just what part you want to copy.
 

Thread Starter

jacaylor

Joined Nov 2, 2020
6
I can give you a zip file with LTspice simulations of approximately 1200 circuits, that I have developed and collected. You get a fair number of additional circuits from the LTspice download. It's enough to keep you occupied for months on end.
That would be wonderful!
 

Thread Starter

jacaylor

Joined Nov 2, 2020
6
One website that includes quite a bit of that is "Schematics for free.com" and if you do a search for that some others pop up as well. Also lots of circuits of complete products, where one would need to decide what portion they want to copy.
So yes, circuits are freely available but not ina "ccokbook" sort of format. Which I consider just as well. A bit of mental exercise is a good thing, figuring just what part you want to copy.
Honestly, the mental exercise is good, but It would be nice to develop a sort of "cookbook" as you put it, and even expand on to it explaining what is happening in the circuits. I have always wanted to do it myself.
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
3,311
The .zip file is 130 MB and that is too big for the AAC server. There is another problem and that is the use of additional libraries. One of them is on GitHub and the other is here:
http://bordodynov.ltwiki.org/
Maybe give me some idea of what you are interested in, and I can pare the size down a bit.
Hi PB
Suggestion...
Sounds like the .zip file might contain a few .raw files included. You can remove those as they are quite big and are not needed.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
18,978
Hi PB
Suggestion...
Sounds like the .zip file might contain a few .raw files included. You can remove those as they are quite big and are not needed.
Good thinking, but all .raw and .log files are removed automatically when I close LTspice. I also check regularly and remove any that manage to remain as the result of crashes which happen from time to time.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
14,902
I am looking for a place where I could find like schematics of different types of general circuits.
Check the application notes from the likes of National Semiconductor, Signetics, etc. I literally read them word by word in the late 1970's/early 80's. Signetics had some good application notes on communications circuits, consumer electronics, and telecommunications.
 

Attachments

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
3,311
Good thinking, but all .raw and .log files are removed automatically when I close LTspice. I also check regularly and remove any that manage to remain as the result of crashes which happen from time to time.
Hmmm...OK...well I only made the suggestion because even for 1200 circuits, 120MB is quite large.
Average .asc file size is usually about 5k-15k, .plt files about 1-2k.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
18,978
So, with some idea of the building blocks you are looking for, I could maybe come up with something smaller in size and more suitable for your purposes.
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
22,988
Have you looked at the stickies on this forum? The various indexes have lots and lots of examples of various circuits. What you are looking for is called a cookbook, there are lots of old transistor cookbooks I used to get from the library haven't seen too many lately.
 

BobaMosfet

Joined Jul 1, 2009
2,007
Hi all, I am looking for a place where I could find like schematics of different types of general circuits. Like building block circuits. For example, this would include things like filters, transistor amplifier classes, rectifiers, tone control stages, adders, etc. I want to get a general idea of waveform mapping through different circuits so that I can work on my wave shaping. Also, I would hope to compile like a list or something of the sort.

Thanks,
Josh

--Note: I do know of places like "circuit finder", "all schematics" and things like that.
Look for books by: Forrest M. Mims III

You can find them on Amazon, and elsewhere. Check your library. And here is another book you need:

Title: Understanding Basic Electronics, 1st Ed.
Publisher: The American Radio Relay League
ISBN: 0-87259-398-3
 

ErnieM

Joined Apr 24, 2011
8,328
Once I worked with (or for, he was the manager) who had what I called his "Golden Book of Circuits."

Everything he designed was made of blocks copied from that book. I had giggles many times, such as when he needed a reference voltage for a comparator, so he used a resistor divider BUT he put a unity gain buffer between the Rs and the comparator.

He has not a good designer.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
14,902
Everything he designed was made of blocks copied from that book.
Real designers don't need to resort to that. For any who do, I hope they provide attribution to give credit to the creative work of others.

I've had people try to pass off my ideas as their own. When I catch them, they earn a lifetime appointment to my sh*t list. The only way to get off it is to die.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
18,978
Real designers don't need to resort to that. For any who do, I hope they provide attribution to give credit to the creative work of others.

I've had people try to pass off my ideas as their own. When I catch them, they earn a lifetime appointment to my sh*t list. The only way to get off it is to die.
Fortunately for you that is an ultimate outcome.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,697
The tedious part is when one inherits the designs patched together from cookbooks that meet some of the requirements and sort of work, but not adequately. Then the request is to "fix it without making changes or increasing the cost or changing the production process." And have it fixed by next week. I am still grateful to Analog Devices for creating the 2B31J instrument amp! (That was quite a long time ago)
 

ErnieM

Joined Apr 24, 2011
8,328
Real designers don't need to resort to that. For any who do, I hope they provide attribution to give credit to the creative work of others.

I've had people try to pass off my ideas as their own. When I catch them, they earn a lifetime appointment to my sh*t list. The only way to get off it is to die.
Another of his "designs" carefully crafted out of Golden Book examples when an existing design of perhaps 8 or so logic chips was redesigned to make it dual redundant. I believe his chip count hit some 30 or 40 devices by the time he was done. Never a thought to change anything there, always just add more chips.

A year or so after he left I did my own design of a dual-redundant controller. As I had already cut the existing design chip count from those 8 chips to 2, it just took me 4 chips for dual redundancy. As a bonus it used the same PCB assembly, you just stacked one board on top of the other.
 
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