Buck circuit suggestion for 24v to 12v

Thread Starter

uzairali001

Joined Sep 8, 2015
8
I'm planning to install LEDs strip to each steps of my stair, there are total 19 steps and I want to control all of them individually so I planned to create small pcb for each steps which consist of 1 ws2811s, 1 5v linear voltage regulator and 3 mosfets for rgb. Now to minimize voltage drop I want to use 24v supply and then drop voltages to 12v on each cirtuit. Each strip is 1meter long maximum current draw will 3.6 amps.

Since I'm not pro so my design might have some flaws or it can be improve so please guide me
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
6,659
3.6A x 12V x 19 steps = allowing for less than 100% efficiency that is close to a kilowatt over those 19 meters of LED strips. I suggest that you give some thought to how can you be sure that a fire won't develop somewhere in there?

To get answers to your question, it might help to post a schematic if you have one.
 

Thread Starter

uzairali001

Joined Sep 8, 2015
8
3.6A x 12V x 19 steps = allowing for less than 100% efficiency that is close to a kilowatt over those 19 meters of LED strips. I suggest that you give some thought to how can you be sure that a fire won't develop somewhere in there?

To get answers to your question, it might help to post a schematic if you have one.
Does 820watt really that bad? Again it's absolute maximum all LEDs won't stay on for most of the time only when motion detected. But let's suppose my circuit draws 820watts all the times what could I do to ensure it won't caught fire
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
6,659
Your best bet is to hire an electrician or consult the electrical code that is effective where the house is.

To answer your question: 820 watts is more than enough to start a fire if the power is concentrated. I am not qualified to tell you how to make a safe installation -electricians are supposed to know that, but they might now be prepared to deal with custom circuits.

I made a couple of about 1/2 LED night lights some years ago. I spent more time inducing faults, blowing them up, and analyzing the results than I spent designing the things. That is because a little mistake can end up costing dearly.

With any luck somebody with the required knowledge will come by and give advice. All I can to is suggest that you exercise extreme caution with respect to fire and electrical safety. Designing something cool is worth one kissy point. Killing or injuring one person or burning down a house resets the counter to zero :)
 
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