Breadboard to Prototyping Board

Thread Starter

Yarmond15

Joined Aug 28, 2020
14
So I'm attempting to covert a breadboard project to a solderable prototyping board and in my experience it is best to have at least a second set of eyes. I was curious to see if there was a software program that can convert a breadboard project to a wiring schematic that I could then translate to a PCB. Atattched is a picture of the planned circut the other is my attempt at translating it to a PCB format.
Thanks ahead of time!Wiring 1.JPGPCB Path.JPG
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,088
I am not aware of any software that will go from breadboard to schematic. I use Eagle to go from schematic to solderable breadboard. Surely, you must have a schematic or can make one.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,682
So I'm attempting to covert a breadboard project to a solderable prototyping board and in my experience it is best to have at least a second set of eyes.
There's so little wiring. Unless you're going to make dozens of them, it would be more cost effective to just do point to point wiring on some perforated board.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
12,264
I don't quite understand your meaning, for the signal cable?
hi,
You show the PWM signal lines, but there is no 0V reference on the PCB for those signals, unless you connect the Arduino 0V to the PCB, the Servo's will not work.

E

Update:
Look at this image.

BTW: On your bread board the Diode is not connected at one end.

On the PCB its connect across the transistor, not the motor.
 

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Thread Starter

Yarmond15

Joined Aug 28, 2020
14
hi,
You show the PWM signal lines, but there is no 0V reference on the PCB for those signals, unless you connect the Arduino 0V to the PCB, the Servo's will not work.

E

Update:
Look at this image.

BTW: On your bread board the Diode is not connected at one end.

On the PCB its connect across the transistor, not the motor.
I believe the diode on the breadboard is connected to the middle pin of the transistor, not sure what the yellow wire is supposed to be for though... (I did not design the breadboard XD). Also, I am not familiar with the 0V reference, how would I wire that?
 

trebla

Joined Jun 29, 2019
285
In this case 0V = GND. Unless you connect Arduinos ground to breadboard ground, all signal wires from Arduio are floating and no current will flow through.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,561
I believe the diode on the breadboard is connected to the middle pin of the transistor, not sure what the yellow wire is supposed to be for though... (I did not design the breadboard XD). Also, I am not familiar with the 0V reference, how would I wire that?
Re: the diode...

It should be connected across the two terminals of the motor. It’s cathode should be connected to the plus terminal of the motor. It’s a anode should be connected to the motor terminal that connects to ground (or negative supply or 0V).

The breadboard has the anode connected to... nowhere. (Or to the yellow wire, which connects to... nothing).

The breadboard might work, but without the diode connected correctly, the transistor could be destroyed.
 

Thread Starter

Yarmond15

Joined Aug 28, 2020
14
In this case 0V = GND. Unless you connect Arduinos ground to breadboard ground, all signal wires from Arduio are floating and no current will flow through.
So if I connect the GND pin on the Arduino to the Emitter pin on the transistor, would that work?
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,561
So if I connect the GND pin on the Arduino to the Emitter pin on the transistor, would that work?
Rhetorical question. Is the emitter on the transistor connected to the battery ground (negative end)???

Then, the Arduino and your module have a common or connected grounds. The signals from the Arduino can be understood because they have a common reference point.

Connecting to the transistor emitter is NOT why it works. Connecting the ground of both modules IS why it works.
 

Thread Starter

Yarmond15

Joined Aug 28, 2020
14
Re: the diode...

The breadboard has the anode connected to... nowhere. (Or to the yellow wire, which connects to... nothing).
The way a breadboard is built, if I were to remove the yellow wire attached to the Cathode of the diode (or just ignore it), the cathode would be connected to both the collector pin on the transistor, as well as the negative motor terminal. Would that work?
 

upand_at_them

Joined May 15, 2010
762
FYI: There are protoboards you can get that have the same layout as a breadboard. I think Radio Shack sells them if there's one in your area. Probably eBay and other sources, too. But your circuit is so simple it doesn't need much. I think the age-old technique is to protoboard it and then learn from your mistakes for next time. Don't be afraid to screw up...that's how you learn. After you protoboard it, post it here to get feedback.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,561
The way a breadboard is built, if I were to remove the yellow wire attached to the Cathode of the diode (or just ignore it), the cathode would be connected to both the collector pin on the transistor, as well as the negative motor terminal. Would that work?
Is the collector of the transistor connected to the positive motor terminal?

Then it would work. If that isn’t true, it might work but the diode isn’t doing anything and the transistor could be destroyed. It might be easier to solder the diode in the correct orientation directly to the motor terminals.
 

Thread Starter

Yarmond15

Joined Aug 28, 2020
14
Alright, thank you all, I'm uploading a revised version of the circuit, let me know if it works and if I'm missing anything.
Thanks!
PCB Revised.JPG
 
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