Best Soldered Wire protector? Heat Shrink?

Thread Starter

KevinSRussell

Joined Mar 11, 2019
40
Chaps

Just a quickie - what's the best solution for covering wires that have been soldered together? I've pretty sure I used neoprene sleeving during my apprenticeship but I wouldn't know now.

Also, I will be putting a Kettle socket in a project box - I need to insulate the back of the socket.

Kevin
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,612
Heat shrink tubing it the standard. There are other options but they are usually only used in special cases (e.g.: high heat).

I am partial to "dual wall" tubing which includes an adhesive that flows inside the tube as it shrinks. It is also called "marine".

It's not always applicable, but it protects and prevents the tubing from sliding.

A cheap hot air soldering tool (search for 858D, there are many variants) is a great way to apply the tubing and has further utility, even its intended purpose!
 

Thread Starter

KevinSRussell

Joined Mar 11, 2019
40
Thanks for that. On a slightly different note - I am wiring inside a wooden frame, what's the best way to fix the wires. Glue gun? Silicon?
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,612
Thanks for that. On a slightly different note - I am wiring inside a wooden frame, what's the best way to fix the wires. Glue gun? Silicon?
Hot glue is very common, and has the advantage of fast bonding. Depending on what the wiring looks like, looming it and using clamps or clips would be my approach because I really like orderly wiring. Some clips can be placed at regular intervals and wires routed through them, then if needed, tacked down with hot glue (called "hot snot" by many people, you might encounter that).

It will depend on the number of wires that need fixing and the time you want to spend.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,108
I have had poor luck with adhesive clips. Even with some 3M versions, the adhesive gets old or gooey and they fall off. Hot melt works well. E6000 ("Goop") from Eclectic Chemical is my favorite if overnight curing is not a problem. Pliobond will also work. I prefer something that has a little flexibility and almost any adhesive that is flexible will work.

Back to your first question, agreed that heat shrink tubing is the way to go. Most of what you see on shelves is based on PVC, but for high wear or chemical resistance, you can get it made from other elastomers, including neoprene: https://www.mcmaster.com/neoprene-rubber-heat-shrink-tubing Teflon is also available, but its shrink temp is quite a bit higher. When I need Teflon, I just use it in spaghetti tubing form.

For wires that are already soldered in place, you can get a self-fusing rubber tape or as a last resort, "liquid electric tape."
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,612
I have had poor luck with adhesive clips. Even with some 3M versions, the adhesive gets old or gooey and they fall off. Hot melt works well. E6000 ("Goop") from Eclectic Chemical is my favorite if overnight curing is not a problem. Pliobond will also work. I prefer something that has a little flexibility and almost any adhesive that is flexible will work.

Back to your first question, agreed that heat shrink tubing is the way to go. Most of what you see on shelves is based on PVC, but for high wear or chemical resistance, you can get it made from other elastomers, including neoprene: https://www.mcmaster.com/neoprene-rubber-heat-shrink-tubing Teflon is also available, but its shrink temp is quite a bit higher. When I need Teflon, I just use it in spaghetti tubing form.

For wires that are already soldered in place, you can get a self-fusing rubber tape or as a last resort, "liquid electric tape."
For wood I’ve often used the four-slot nylon cable tie mounts which are self adhesive. I only use the adhesive for positioning, though, and they get a screw in the middle. For chassis type clips, I’ve have good and bad experiences. But, with fresh stock, a little isopropanol cleaning, and careful application, I’ve had them stay in place for years.

I have had them fall off, though, so I know what you are talking about.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,317
+1 for heat shrink tubing. For cases where tubing can't be used, electrical tape. If you're worried about the tape coming off, use self fusing silicon tape:
 

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
1,196
A good abrasion resistant shrink tubing over a “Western Union” splice is the way to go.

Of course wherever possible I always avoid splicing wires and use a "euro" style terminal block.
 
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